1968: Dorothy Ashby - Afro-Harping

People seem to approach jazz music in two general ways. Some listen with genuine artistic appreciation, while others are content looking through a slick, hipster's lens. That is to say, jazz can be viewed on both an intellectual and superficial level, and while it may be pompous to deem a specific way of listening 'better' than another, one thing is for sure: On albums like Herbie Hancock's Headhunters and Weather Report's Heavy Weather, two polarized vantage points collide, transcending genre to reach a somewhat simpler epithet: good fucking music. I have little reservations when applying such a universal tag on Dorothy Ashby's 1968 gem, Afro-Harping.

First things first, yes, Afro-Harping is literal in referencing the Harp. You know, that instrument one of the Marx brothers played? Well, in the hands of Ashby, it becomes everything but a shtick. Alongside arranger Richard Evans, she crafts a collection of highly accessible, highly virtuosic jazz and pop numbers. The opener, "Soul Vibrations," and the title track are the most immediate cuts, using surprisingly funky rhythm sections to support a series of effortless, syncopated harp riffs. The fact that Ashby can lead a band with such a typically subdued, almost muted instrument is nothing short of remarkable. Things do occasionally veer towards easy listening, but the rough production and laid back, ever present groove maintains interest throughout. Eventually, each song's core theme starts to sink in, allowing you to fully enjoy Ashby's concise soloing. Of course, not all accolades are reserved for the harp. Richard Evans orchestration is subtle but effective. A low murmur of vibes and strings add extra elements of unexpectedness that, when coupled with the rhythm section, mimic a R&B aficionado's wet dream. Unfortunately, none of the session musicians are credited, leaving only Ashby and Evans to bear responsibility for this forgotten classic.

Needless to say, Afro-Harping is an essential introduction to harp and jazz music in general. Dorothy Ashby clearly expands the assumed limitations of her instrument, creating a sound that is familiar yet vaguely foreign at the same time. After all, when was the last time you heard a harpist break it down behind a thumping backbeat? It doesn't matter if you're in it for the novelty or for the intellectual exercise: Afro-Harping is jazz, but beyond that, it's just good fucking music.

DeLorean

There’s a lot of good music out there, and it’s not all being released this year. With DeLorean, we aim to rediscover overlooked artists and genres, to listen to music historically and contextually, to underscore the fluidity of music. While we will cover reissues here, our focus will be on music that’s not being pushed by a PR firm.

Newsfeed