1963: Phil Spector [Various Artists] - A Christmas Gift For You from Phil Spector

In the early ‘60s, Phil Spector was on top of the world. His orchestral production style had become something of an industry standard for pop music, having already helmed classic songs, including The Crystals’ “He’s A Rebel” and “Da Doo Ron Ron;” Darlene Love’s “Today I Met The Boy I’m Gonna Marry;” and the unparalleled “Be My Baby” by The Ronettes. By 1963, Phil Spector had a healthy roster of artists, an arsenal of musicians, and commercial credibility to burn.

So, it was perhaps inevitable that Spector would assemble these assets for a compilation record, and his usual “wall of sound” -- with sleigh bells and strings -- made a Christmas tracklist a no-brainer. A Christmas Gift For You from Phil Spector came out on November 22, 1963, a day on which people were more preoccupied with a president’s fatal gunshot wound than decking the halls. For this reason, the record was slow to catch on, and only in subsequent years did it become known as pop music’s best ever Christmas album.

The record assembles some of Spector’s all-stars, including The Ronettes, The Crystals, and Darlene Love. The songs are largely old chestnuts, such as “White Christmas” and “Sleigh Ride,” but the Spector treatment on these familiar tracks is revelatory. It’s not until you hear these versions when you realize Spector was born to do this project, and it’s also hard to imagine what the pop world was like before this record came out. Much of what we associate with rock ‘n’ roll holiday music -- from the low baritone sax to high glockenspiel -- owes a debt of gratitude to these 13 songs. Without this record, there would be no Springsteen covering “Santa Claus Is Coming To Town,” no Mariah Carey’s “All I Want For Christmas Is You.” In other words, this record has a lot to answer for.

As with all Phil Spector music, the production and arrangements on A Christmas Gift For You are as much the stars as his singers. Spector’s attention to detail here is nothing short of stunning, from the descending chords on The Crystals’ “Santa Claus Is Coming To Town” to the “ring-a-ling-a-ling, ding-dong-ding” background vocals of The Ronettes’ “Sleigh Ride.” Just as Spector regularly imbued teenage pop music with old-fashioned melodrama, here he gives Christmas music, the epitome of schmaltz, genuine passion.

The record’s centerpiece is Darlene Love’s “Christmas (Baby Please Come Home),” one of pop’s most-covered songs. Though it lasts less than three minutes, it’s a breathtaking slice of heartbreak, featuring melancholy sleigh bells and Love’s forlorn voice as main attractions. Love was brought in for vocals after The Ronettes’ Ronnie Spector, a singer more accustomed to cooing than pleading, didn’t work out. Love’s delivery borders on mania, and she seems to lose all control by the time she wails “please, please, please” over Leon Russell’s piano octave runs near the song’s end. It’s one of the great moments in rock history.

The record’s lowlights are few but obvious. Spector himself shows up for a spoken message over a cloying version of “Silent Night,” which closes the album. The unnecessary sound-effect introduction of The Ronettes’ “I Saw Mommy Kissing Santa Claus” is equally cringe-inducing. These are rare moments when Spector doesn’t trust his audience, providing exposition instead of bells and whistles

Otherwise, A Christmas Gift For You from Phil Spector more than earns its reputation as a holiday and rock ‘n’ roll classic. Like Linus’ monologue and folks dressed up like Eskimos, this is what Christmas is all about. Accept no imitations.


There’s a lot of good music out there, and it’s not all being released this year. With DeLorean, we aim to rediscover overlooked artists and genres, to listen to music historically and contextually, to underscore the fluidity of music. While we will cover reissues here, our focus will be on music that’s not being pushed by a PR firm.