The Flaming Lips / Ariel Pink's Haunted Graffiti / Thee Oh Sees
Fox Theater; Oakland, CA

[10-01-2010]

There is something strangely illustrious about the Fox Theater in Oakland, from its statues and acoustics to the lights in the ceiling. It makes sense The Flaming Lips would employ this venue for a two-night stand. A coincidental bonus was the first show falling on the same night as the Oakland Art Murmur, just a few blocks up from the venue, filled with cool galleries and awesome grilled-cheese sandwiches.

Thee Oh Sees seemed destined to be forgotten on this particular night. It’s not their fault; they played a great set, but their style and approach aren’t quite ready for big venues yet, and they had to contend with opening for two expansive bands. They had their psych moments, which were amazing. Still, it seemed like most had forgotten about them an hour later.

Say what you will about Ariel Pink’s sets, but there’s one thing for certain: He’s getting better. Coming out with his Haunted Graffiti, decked out in M.I.A.’s street clothes, he talks about wanting to French the crowd, which he proceeds to do to an unsuspecting Flaming Lips fan (she seemed happy about it) during “Beverly Kills.” His mannerisms and singing have gotten to the level where he could easily be nominated to become the next official Hedwig for her Angry Inch. Sadly, the numbers from House Arrest and The Doldrums, which sounded incredible, didn’t resonate with the crowd that much. Ariel Pink also clearly missed an awesome sing-along opportunity for “Round and Round.” Still, definitely one of his better sets.

Ever been to a Pentecostal megachurch? The experience one gets out of those churches is similar to what one gets out of a Flaming Lips concert, which is why you should go to one in your lifetime. Beyond all the confetti and balloons and other eye candy, Wayne Coyne played a pastor with a spiritual message, bent on making people feel hopeful about themselves, to connect with each other in, oh so many ways. Whether through reaching out with the Spaceball or just facing the camera behind his microphone, Wayne Coyne exudes an aura of hope and sincerity. That charisma and the ability to stretch songs into something both original yet recognizable make the Flaming Lips not just a band, but a revival of sorts.

[Photos: Ze Pequeno]