Girls / Tamaryn / Dominant Legs
Bottom of the Hill; San Francisco, CA

[11-21-2009]

The sold-out Girls show at San Francisco’s Bottom of the Hill is not as triumphant as I hoped. One might think a celebration of San Francisco would be joyous, but jamming a crowd of Mission District Hipsters (Mishsters?) into a tiny venue is like putting one too many toddlers in a playpen. Tantrums are thrown, hair is pulled, dresses and lipstick compete for attention. It is difficult to consider other people when so much of your time and energy is focused on the careful construction of your own identity. Not to mention the desire to let EVERYONE KNOW YOU ARE FRIENDS WITH CHRISTOPHER OWENS and your insistence that your tits can be seen bouncing in the music video for “Lust for Life.” We get it: you’re special and unique. Now please stop making out with each other so we can enjoy the fucking show.

Dominant Legs is Ryan William Lynch and Hannah Hunt (sporting an oversized letterman jacket). They sing lush pop songs with titles like “Young at Love and Life,” featuring only a guitar, drum machine, and synthesizer. It is easy music to dance to.

Tamaryn is more atmosphere than sound. She struggles to stay on key, delivering a more “drunk at karaoke” performance than something inspired by Kate Bush or Sixousie Sioux.

It’s a shame the Girls' crowd is so awful; Owens and JR White put on a fantastic show. Owens looks adorable and cozy in an oversized reindeer sweater and bright-red vest. He is 29 years old, but a gaunt face and shockingly blue eyes suggest a longer and more wearisome existence (growing up in a cult will do that to you). They open with “Laura,” a disgustingly catchy pop song during which Owens earnestly hopes to “be friends forever” with an ex. The song drifts into dreamy territory as Owens sings “Ba-ba-ba-da-da-da” over guitar reverb, creating something beautiful and melancholic. The drumming and White’s talent on the bass make “God Damned” a harder (and much better) version than the original.

I’m excited for the thrilling crescendo of “Summertime” — a song I like to play whenever I see the city skyline from a distance — but am forced to move because of a girl jumping on my head. Owens eventually stops the show and asks some obnoxious fuckers if “the bullshit is done” before security comes through and kicks them out. Girls recover with the narcotic anthem, “Hellhole Ratrace,” which has everyone singing, “And I don’t wanna die without shaking up a leg or two,” as if we are wasting our youth together.

Or maybe we are all just wasted.

Young Widows / Russian Circles / Helms Alee
Bottom of the Hill; San Francisco, CA

[11-15-2009]

I knew it was going to be loud before I set foot inside Bottom Of The Hill last night, and got an inkling that it might be really loud when I heard gearheads marveling over Young Widows’ and Russian Circles’ assorted Sunn and Emperor products. What resulted, however, was something skull-crushingly loud beyond my expectations. I’m still in a state of shell shock and it’s been a full day. My stomach is still not quite right, possibly because something in my inner ear was damaged, as each band operated at the same basic volume level. The quality of the music wasn’t as uniform.

I arrived ready to be won over by Helms Alee. Won over might even be a term too skewed toward the negative; I liked the idea of liking them. They’re on Hydra Head Records. Ben Verellen looks like a really nice grizzly bear or something. While I was off thinking about what it would have been like to have a grizzly bear for a best friend during childhood, I kept getting drawn back into reality by their heavy-handed use of effects. Verellen’s vocals were especially problematic for me since he was clearly screaming his lungs out but sounded about a million miles away. It was kind of like watching someone scream underwater, or if you took footage of a lion roaring and paired it with a kitten’s meow. I couldn’t get past it.

I can only say that the space-y stoner rock qualities got away from Helms Alee. It’s a shame because the parts that didn’t rely on using pedals and effects sounded interesting, and I liked how the vocal duties were split up amongst the three members. Plus, you know, I would have liked to see how that whole grizzly bear tea party thing ended. (Not that I had tea parties as a kid.)

Russian Circles suffered from almost the opposite problem. It was incredibly easy to stand there and rock my head to but I couldn’t effectively lose myself in it. I kept coming back into my head and thinking, “Wow, are we still here?” The songs churned adequately but never broke out.

If I were to run with my current bear pre-occupation I’d say that Young Widows were “just right.” They took the stage almost entirely backlit by the bright floods built into their equipment -- it definitely stole some of the power from Russian Circles, who came out doing the same thing. Timing notwithstanding, it fit better with Young Widows anyway. The lighting made for a more dis-associative experience and, whether intentionally or not, the light that did fall on their faces directed attention to guitarist Evan Patterson. Everything cooperated to expand my sense of space and time. Where there was grinding and droning it never felt like it was holding anything back; I knew it was leading to something and, instead of hanging there waiting for a climax, I could just enjoy where we were for that moment.

DD/MM/YYYY
Ryerson University; Toronto, ON

[11-12-2009]

The naïve energy of youth must be valorized at all costs. As our bodies begin to deteriorate and memories of post-show sunrises fade, we can take comfort in the fact that a new vanguard of torchbearers will emerge to put on innovative concerts that we can watch with a click of our increasingly-arthritic fingers.

Walking into the Ryerson University’s School of Radio and Television Arts, I met with an intrepid group of fourth-year students who were undertaking – for their final project – a cross-platform series of live music broadcasts. Milking the vast resources at their disposal, their spiritlive.net Third Floor Sessions were capturing performances on professional studio gear and HD cameras, edited in real time and streamed live on the internet. It was DIY on the university dime.

For the second broadcast of their online concert series they recruited Toronto locals DD/MM/YYYY. Blasting into spazzy Beefheart-y chaos they showcased a set built upon simple but jarring guitar lines and a militant rhythm section. Repetitious chants flowed like meta-structures over the songs while severed vocal bursts chipped away at the arrangements from within.

Mosh Rozenberg’s relentless drumming led the assault with a fury that catapulted him off his seat. Jagged phrasing of yelpy calls and echoey responses cut through crunchy and meandering synthesizers. Waves of distortion bled seamlessly into the constitution of each song, playing an integral roll in moving the sounds forward and sharply cutting them off at unexpected moments. “Imagine!” showed concise and restrained pop deconstruction; “Bronzage” saw the band lavishing in brooding psychedelic turmoil. Their were at once epic and handcuffed, their songs aggrandizing and ephemeral.

The set was a reassuring reminder that challenging math rock need not be solely about virtuosic masturbation. It can confront our assumptions and present a disorienting force through clever manipulation of tone, simple rhythmic changes, and contrasting violent and reassuring textures.

Fuck Buttons / Growing / Chen Santa Maria
Bottom of the Hill; San Francisco, CA

[11-13-2009]

“Hey, Ze, you look upset. Everything all right…?”

StupidcrowdsfuckingdouchebagsTHOSELITTLE

“Calm down, Ze. No reason to get angry…”

WHYCAN’TTHEY

“Calm down. Need I remind you why you are not in Chicago anymore, Ze? You’re running out of places to run to.”

… Okay, fine.

“Now what’s making you upset, Ze?”

Well, I went to the Bottom of the Hill tonight to see Fuck Buttons. A sold-out show, no less.

“Well, that could make you upset, what with your type hating sell-outs… ”

How is that even funny?

“Okay. Start from the beginning. Who opened?”

Chen Santa Maria. Some experimental outfit this side of Jandek from Oakland. Not appropriate for the night, I’ll admit, seems like a call-in. They were more suited for something like an art gallery, or a place where you can sit down and listen to them while you wax philosophical over some postmodern theory or something while drinking Starbucks.

“An art gallery? What gives you that impression?”

They were simply experimenting with layers, filling the room with various feedback effects without a lot of structure. Good art, but not quality music. They seemed to fall into some groove about 20 minutes in, but then they stopped their set right afterward. Hardly a good start.

“But nothing to get that upset about. Anyone else support Fuck Buttons?”

Growing, a group from New York that holds some resemblance to Octopus Project (two male guitars one female keyboard), but with less synths and more loops. That's not a bad thing. They fit as a supporting act for Fuck Buttons. Their structure was solid, actually kept some groove going. It was easy to get lost at times though.

“How so?”

Some of the vocal loops were hard to hear, and it was difficult to tell the source of some of the layering. Less the band’s fault, though. They have yet to reach that point where they can effectively recreate the recorded sound live without too many constraints. Give them some time, maybe a headline tour, and they’ll come off quite better.

“Okay. Still doesn’t get to the heart of your concern. Let’s talk about Fuck Buttons.”

Fuck Buttons put on a solid show. They were able to meld their two albums well. They started off with Tarot Sport opener (and single) “Surf Solar,” following up with Street Horrrsing closer “Colours Move.” Very little momentum was lost in the transition. The use of a single drum was beautifully rendered. They focused primarily on the new album, though it can be said that they still don’t have a large enough song list to work with yet. Transitions between songs were incredibly maintained, with only a few drops in momentum. “Flight of the Feathered Serpent” and “Olympians” stood out in particular, as did Street Horrrsing single “Bright Tomorrow.” A beautiful set in the right circumstances.

“'Right circumstances?' So what made the set bad?”

The crowd. They were just awful. They weren’t reacting negatively to the music; they weren’t reacting, PERIOD. You had to feel bad for the duo. They were putting their hearts into it, really trying to build something visceral yet empathic. And all the crowd did for the most part was bob their heads around a little, if that.

“So they didn’t dance?”

No. Not really. I think the only time I really saw the crowd get into it was at the breakout point in “Bright Tomorrow,” and even then it was at most 10 percent of the capacity crowd. A repeat was attempted with “Feathered Serpent,” but it fizzled. What’s worse is that, listening to Fuck Buttons, they really have a danceable rhythm to their songs that makes their impact even more profound. Yet watching the duo, and even watching those in the crowd who danced (including myself), the setting felt like hundreds of hipsters watching monkeys dance. It was depressing, and quite disgusting in a way.

“Why didn’t the hipsters dance, Ze?”

I have no idea. None.

Future of the Left / Ume / Team Band
Bottom Lounge; Chicago IL

[11-05-2009]

The last time I had a chance to see Andy Falkous live was in 2004, when Mclusky were touring to support The Difference Between Me and You Is That I'm Not on Fire. I had my tickets in-hand and my friend and fellow TMT-er Paul Bower visiting from out of town, only to discover Bower’s underage ass wasn’t 21 enough to get into the venue. Of course, Mclusky disintegrated less than a year later, and ever since I’ve been plagued with regret over that (in hindsight) once-in-a-lifetime opportunity. So long story short, Future of the Left’s show at Bottom Lounge came with a fair share of emotional baggage.

{Team Band} was just wrapping up as I arrived. The group stumbled through a few slices of mostly straightforward guitar pop like a drunken wedding band, but they earned my affection by closing with an impromptu cover of The Misfits’ “Where Eagles Dare.” Singer/guitar player Lauren Larson of Austin’s {Ume} took the stage looking like she’d just clocked out from an American Eagle shoot, but her band’s punk-injected rock ’n’ roll spoke for itself. Larson’s breathy delivery turned to sandpaper at all the right moments, the flailing frontwoman transforming into a blur of hair during every guitar solo.

Impressive as {Future of the Left}’s musicianship was, it was almost overshadowed by their razor-sharp stage banter. Even a cursory glance at his lyrics will clue you in to the fact that Andy Falkous is a pretty funny guy, but he and singer/bass player Kelson Mathias riffed effortlessly off one another between songs for 5 minutes at a time. The band even fed on the negative energy coming from the crowd, at times inviting audience members to hurl insults at them. When one frustrated concert-goer accused the band of diluting their set with “stand-up,” Falkous sympathized with his apparent confusion, saying it was like watching a porno where “you tune in for some hardcore gang-banging and they’ve gone and added a post-modern twist.”

Their set borrowed about equally from 2008’s Curses and this year’s Travels. They chainsawed through misanthropic gems like “Arming Eritrea” and “Manchasm” with giddy abandon. Falkous’s animal roar may have taken front-and-center in most songs, but I was absolutely blown away by Mathias. His vocals tend to disappear into the background on the records, but this guy was hitting notes on Friday that I have never heard a dude hit. Future of the Left ended the night with a shambolic performance of “Cloak the Dagger” that degenerated into a hairball of raw noise. In between whammying with a drumstick and playing a discordant keyboard solo, Falkous could be found disassembling Jack Egglestone’s kit while the hapless drummer struggled to keep playing, and all the while Matthias hurled himself into the crowd, occasionally chanting the lyrics to “Wanna Be Startin Somethin.” It was a magnificent way to say goodnight.

Fever Ray
Regency Grand Ballroom; San Francisco, CA

[10-05-2009]

I didn’t really know what to expect from this show. I mainly wondered if I’d see Karin Dreijer Andersson, or if she would conceal herself in a manner similar to her performances as one-half of The Knife. Also, what would the music from her self-titled debut as Fever Ray sound like in a live setting? And: Would there be lasers?

There were indeed lasers, and that was some cool shit, let me tell you. Chilly flood lights and numerous old-fashioned lamps, triggered to switch on and off with the beat of the music, provided additional lighting. The setup made it possible to catch glimpses of Andersson and her band without being able to discern what exactly was happening onstage. Only during “When I Grow Up” did the audience get a fully illuminated look at the whole group, which resembled a scene from a pagan ritual -- the band in costumes, brandishing spears, and Andersson in a dark robe with an enormous collar, hands twitching with energy and eyes never fully focused.

All this provided an excellent frame for the music, which rarely diverged from how it sounds on Fever Ray. Live drumming and guitar effects added the texture necessary for the music to outdo the light show, and amplification increased the intensity of the beats to a bone-shaking degree. We heard the entire album; no encore, and no words from the band. I felt throughout the set that we might all be dispatched to some foreign land presided over by the mysterious figures onstage and live out our days listening to the eerie, unsettling noises resounding through the room. It seemed a fitting sentiment for a show that could have taken place in San Francisco, an ice palace, or outer space.