The Jon Spencer Blues Explosion / Thee Oh Sees
Bimbo's 365; San Francisco, CA

[09-29-2010]

Before I could even begin the process of rocking into oblivion, I had to first overcome the atmosphere of stuffy class at Bimbo’s 365. It is positively mind-boggling to balance pricey $6 bottles of Budweiser with the frantic garage sound of Thee Oh Sees, which is exactly how I was inundated within the first 10 minutes of arrival. Bimbo’s is arranged like a club from gangster cinema, and although the prospect of sitting near the rear in a booth by a circular table while admiring red velvet was slight, it didn’t keep me away from the stage. Although somewhat late, I arrived with enough time to confirm that Thee Oh Sees live experience is the equivalent of a chihuahua, born during the Truman years, on steroids with a guitar. Jon Dwyer’s yips and high-pitched, fuzzed-out vocals flooded the room and deafened me. But ultimately, I was there to see The Blues Explosion, and although my respect for Thee Oh Sees wanes and waxes, it will never compare to my feelings for Jon Spencer’s outfit.

So with much excitement and a push towards the front of the stage, I needed no breath when it came time to react to the initial notes of the Blues Explosion. 1994’s Orange essentially prevented me from being too overtaken by the grunge movement, reminding me that in an age of flannel rock there could still exist a sound between the blues and punk that wasn’t either. Being my first opportunity to see the trio at work, I wasn’t let down for a moment. They didn’t let up either — the songs bled together as my ears bled from the relentless volume. That includes some incredibly well-timed bass explosions from the kick, an effect I attribute to an out-of-house soundman brought in specifically for the Blues Explosion. I also realized that a band such as the Blues Explosion needs nary a second of banter, for the repartee is already cemented into the structure and lyrics of the song.

“THANK YOU VERY MUCH LADIES AND GENTLEMEN, RIGHT NOW I GOT TO TELL YOU ABOUT THE FABULOUS, MOST GROOVY, BELLBOTTOMS!”

Although Jon Spencer is clearly the focal point of the band and the lead sweathog, seeing the group in a live context made me realize two things. First, Judah Bauer is truly responsible for the amazing tone and richness behind the band’s guitar solos and melodies. Second, Russell Simins plays drums the hard way — with little filler or flair, but fast as hell and on-point. Some of the songs are almost exclusively rooted in the snare and kick, with only an occasional hi-hat or crash cymbal to punctuate an entire verse. From that simple approach, a visceral lather of sexiness is applied to a crowd that becomes putty in the hands of these masters.

[Photo: Danielle St Laurent]