Jeremy Enigk
World Waits Lewis Hollow http://www.tinymixtapes.comsites/default/files/arton5247_0.jpg

[Lewis Hollow; 2006]

Rating: 2/5 2 / 5 (0)

Styles: '80s pop-rock, orchestral rock
Others: The Fire Theft, Sunny Day Real Estate, U2, Simple Minds


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When was it that we stepped into the magic time portal and ended up in 1986? Something about the sound of Jeremy Enigk's latest record, World Waits, feels like an underwhelming prequel of some kind (The Phantom Menace, anyone?). There's something sweetly ironic about the former lead singer of indie semi-gods Sunny Day Real Estate and The Fire Theft making a record that sounds like Simple Minds. Unfortunately, it's so sweet that it turns you off, like eating ten bags of marshmallows in one sitting.

See, this record could have been a lot easier to swallow were it delivered by U2, or perhaps Simply Red. Enigk has stated in recent interviews that he is feeling more at peace with himself, and it shows ”” perhaps too much. There was still a feeling of slight agitation on Return of The Frog Queen that made its songs slightly grittier and ultimately more interesting. Enigk still writes great melodies; it's just that this time they aren't as engaging as what he has delivered under previous monikers.

In fact, the only immensely memorable track on the album is "City Tonight," perhaps due in part to its Pet Shop Boys synth and the fact that Enigk claims that he "is hugely influenced by U2," but doubts "that [his] music sounds too much like them," yet wrote a song that Coldplay would have been proud of for its saccharine, Bono-esque qualities (and not the side of Bono that I like).

Layers of very serious, intense drums surround sweeping, equally intense vocals in an epic arrangement of sound that smells a bit like Waterboys. Listening to World Waits, you get the feeling that it would be a more enjoyable record if Enigk didn't execute every single note with such immense, ridiculous fervor. Each song feels carefully calculated and deliberately squeezed from every pore on each musician's body. But while this quality could be engaging, it is more of an unfortunate liability on an album that could have used less sugar and more vinegar. Or perhaps Enigk should have set the time machine's dial to ten years after 1996, rather than ten years before it.

When was it that we stepped into the magic time portal and ended up in 1986? Something about the sound of Jeremy Enigk's latest record, World Waits, feels like an underwhelming prequel of some kind (The Phantom Menace, anyone?). There's something sweetly ironic about the former lead singer of indie semi-gods Sunny Day Real Estate and The Fire Theft making a record that sounds like Simple Minds. Unfortunately, it's so sweet that it turns you off, like eating ten bags of marshmallows in one sitting.
See, this record could have been a lot easier to swallow were it delivered by U2, or perhaps Simply Red. Enigk has stated in recent interviews that he is feeling more at peace with himself, and it shows — perhaps too much. There was still a feeling of slight agitation on Return of The Frog Queen that made its songs slightly grittier and ultimately more interesting. Enigk still writes great melodies; it's just that this time they aren't as engaging as what he has delivered under previous monikers.
In fact, the only immensely memorable track on the album is "City Tonight," perhaps due in part to its Pet Shop Boys synth and the fact that Enigk claims that he "is hugely influenced by U2," but doubts "that [his] music sounds too much like them," yet wrote a song that Coldplay would have been proud of for its saccharine, Bono-esque qualities (and not the side of Bono that I like).
Layers of very serious, intense drums surround sweeping, equally intense vocals in an epic arrangement of sound that smells a bit like Waterboys. Listening to World Waits, you get the feeling that it would be a more enjoyable record if Enigk didn't execute every single note with such immense, ridiculous fervor. Each song feels carefully calculated and deliberately squeezed from every pore on each musician's body. But while this quality could be engaging, it is more of an unfortunate liability on an album that could have used less sugar and more vinegar. Or perhaps Enigk should have set the time machine's dial to ten years after 1996, rather than ten years before it.

1.New Beginning, A
2.Been Here Before
3.River To Sea
4.City Tonight
5.Cannons
6.Damien Dreams
7.Wayward Love
8.Dare A Smile
9.World Waits
10.Burn