Loren Connors
The Hymn of the North Star Family Vineyard http://www.tinymixtapes.comsites/default/files/arton4277_0.jpg

[Family Vineyard; 2007]

Rating: 4.5/5 4.5 / 5 (0)

Styles: avant-garde, experimental, improvisational, blues
Others: Tony Conrad, Alan Licht, Phillip Glass, Son House, John Fahey, Derek Bailey


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Over the course of three decades, Loren Connors has persevered by showcasing his guitar prowess while transforming the man-with-guitar genre into a masterful form of expressionism. Behind Connors' latest crown jewel, The Hymn of the North Star, the science is subtlety.

The Hymn of the North Star isn't much different from his other gems, relying on fragile plucks to create an illusive soundtrack; this minimalistic approach is nothing new for Connors. Though The Hymn of the North Star doesn't reinvent the solo guitar album, its whispered tones and sparse arrangements are not run-of-the-mill tactics employed just for effect. Each track is part of a greater whole; Connors explores the terra firma of conductor and composer. He plays with the space between sounds, transforming signature blues progressions and licks into experimental pieces in which isolated guitar bellows clash with the muted white noise of needle on vinyl. This push-pull envelops the entire album, rendering individual tracks insignificant in and of themselves.

The beauty of previous Loren Connors albums is that you can pick different tracks to match your different moods. The Hymn of the North Star allows for no such cherry-picking, with Connors' guitar dictating a single, pervasive atmosphere and mood. Such an album would crumble in the hands of a lesser talent, but Loren Connors, ever the artist, has always shown a delicate touch, whatever his subject matter. The Hymn of the North Star is as fragile as they come, but Connors turns it into a 30-minute operatic piece, using just faint strands of guitar and bass to mesmerize us.

1. Part One2. Part Two3. Part Three4. Part Four5. Part Five6. Part Six

  

Some musical ruptures are so penetrating, so incisive that we just can’t help but exclaim EUREKA! While many of our picks here defy categorization and test the boundaries of what exactly discerns ‘music’ from ‘noise,’ others complement or continue anachronistic traditions that have provided new forms and ways of listening. We consider the section a work-in-progress, so expect its definition to be in perpetual flux. Check out the section here.