Band of Horses Reject Wal-Mart’s Advances, Lose Potential Cash Money, or: Ben Bridwell Kills Future Chances of Becoming a Wal-Mart Greeter When He Is Old and Grey

It was (apparently) a mix of negative fan reactions and ye good ol’ fashioned righteousness that brought Band of Horses frontman Ben Bridwell to kill a deal with Wal-Mart that would have released rights for the track “The Funeral” to the aforementioned Warehouse O’The Man.

Though Band of Horses did previously release some rights for Cease to Begin tracks to Ford (corporate vroom vroom), Bridwell obviously decided that selling artistic output to big, bad Wal-Mart would make TMT writers too smug in their metaphors. In other words, people like me rushing to finish a story and take the easy way out (i.e., poking fun at Bridwell’s almost-deal-with-the-devil as symbolic of modern-day corporate-American-dream-killing1).

Apparently, profiting from Ford is fine by Bridwell, since calling Ford a corporate dream-killer nowadays is far too grossly anachronistic for any history-loving, metaphor-making fan to muster.

Had this been the 1920s, that metaphor could have been more palpable. If you didn’t have a Model T.2

LONG STORY SHORT: your favorite ponies are touring, continuing to tour, and picking up ladies with sweet Model Ts, and touring, and touring:

Current dates:

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