Fox Lifts Ban on Universal Music Content, Maintains Ban on Not Sucking as a Network

Okay, guys. For those of you who were totally bummed out that you wouldn’t be hearing Guns N' Roses’ version of “Live And Let Die” in the new Fox flick Alien Vs. Predator: Requiem this Christmas, I’ve got some good news for you!

That’s right! Everyone’s favorite producers of banal movies and biased television, The 20th Century Fox Corporation (a property of News Corp.), has recently lifted its hilariously unwarranted ban on the use of Universal Music Group content.

Just in case you’re, like, TOTALLY lame and haven’t been scanning the Digital Music News site on the internet for the past year or so, the bad-ass ban -- which affected various film and television studios -- was implemented by News Corp. president, COO, and all-around bitchy crab-ass Peter Chernin shortly after Universal Music sued MySpace in November 2006. Did I mention that News Corp. owns MySpace?? Oh, what a tangled web!

The move may be part of an effort to smooth relations between the two catty groups, even though Universal’s lawsuit, which alleges that MySpace permitted its users to upload thousands of Universal’s music videos to the site and that MySpace's reformatting of the videos for playback constitutes copyright infringement, still stands.

Citing unnamed sources, The Wall Street Journal (who originally broke the story) noted that various producers were expressing frustration over the fact that they couldn’t pump their movies full of Andrew W.K. and Smashmouth songs.

In other words, the hasty ban created more of a headache for Fox than Universal, so they wussed-out. But now that they’ve put this ugliness behind them, Fox can concentrate on what’s REALLY important: making quality films.

Newsfeed