Missing Pussy Riot member Nadya Tolokonnikova discovered in Siberian prison hospital

Missing Pussy Riot member Nadya Tolokonnikova discovered in Siberian prison hospital http://www.tinymixtapes.com/sites/default/files/1311/news-13-11-pussy-riot-siberia.jpg

Update: Rolling Stone reports that Nadezhda Tolokonnikova was moved to a hospital, not a new prison, so she could be treated for conditions related to her hunger strike.

News update, everyone: Pussy Riot’s missing member Nadya Tolokonnikova is alive and (relatively?) well. Missing since earlier this month, Tolokonnikova has been discovered in a Siberian penal colony. She has ended the hunger strike which she started in September to bring attention to the horrendous conditions facing prisoners like herself.

Vladimir Lukin, a Russian human rights official, told news agency ITAR-TASS that Tolokonnikova’s alleged disappearance can be attributed to the standard 10-day quarantine that Russian prisoners receive between transferring prisons. According to Lukin, the jailed Pussy Riot member will meet with lawyers and her husband this week. Tolokonnikova, along with fellow punk rockers Yekaterina Samutsevich and Maria Alekhina, received a sentence of two year’s imprisonment after a now-famous Pussy Riot performance at Moscow’s Christ the Saviour Cathedral protesting the links between the Russian Orthodox Church and President Vladimir Putin. The charge was described as “hooliganism motivated by religious hatred or hostility.” Although Samutsevich has been freed, Tolokonnikova and Alekhina have been sentenced till March 2014.

• Free Pussy Riot: http://freepussyriot.org

Thug Entrancer to release Death After Life on Oneohtrix Point Never’s Software imprint

Ryan McRyhew is a long-time, influential member of the Denver electronic music scene, having performed and released music as Thundercade and in groups like Cougar Legs and Hideous Men (who recently performed at Denver’s Goldrush Music Festival, put on by our very own Strauss). His latest project is named Thug Entrancer, and while a brief stint in Chicago aligned his tightly sequenced, DIY approach to experimental electronic music with a rich history of electronic dance music, he’s back in Denver, inadvertently proving how his music — an analog hybridization of juke, techno, house, acid, and more — is not geographically bound.

Death After Life will prove as much when it’s released next year on Daniel Lopatin’s Software Recording Co. The album expands on a 5-track EP of the same name that was self-released earlier this year on his own Laser Palace imprint (which is no stranger to these parts). The new version features three new tracks and a couple bonus cuts.

Check out the video for “Death After Life IV” below, and look for Death After Life on February 11, 2014.

• Thug Entrancer: http://thugentrancer.com
• Software: http://www.softwarelabel.net
• Laser Palace: http://www.laserpalace.com

[Photo: Jonathan Galbreath]

Superior Viaduct dips into the Brigitte Fontaine vaults for two reissues

It has been a banner year for the Bay Area archival label Superior Viaduct, which went from issuing a handful of Tuxedomoon-related obscurities to close out 2012 (Noh Mercy, Factrix, The Sleepers) to trafficking in a range of European and American avant-garde offerings. Such projects as a vinyl issue of Fluxus artist Henry Flynt’s Graduation and reissues of rarities like Musica su Schemi from Gruppo di Improvisazione Nuovo Consonanza (Cramps, 1976) and Phill Niblock’s Nothing to Look at Just a Record (India Navigation, 1982) offset the much-anticipated reemergence of Devo’s storied Hardcore set, out of print for nearly two decades. Their vinyl reissues are manufactured to exacting quality, and contain copious liner notes — something often missing from needle-drop and ultra-compressed, shoddy grey-market reissues that clog the bins (Phoenix Records, anyone?).

Perhaps the work of French chanteuse Brigitte Fontaine appears a little out of place next to the Darkwave industrial/post-punk moves of the Tuxedomoon crowd or the improvisational sound-art world of Il Gruppo. But the seven albums she recorded for the French label Saravah (alongside one for BYG) between 1968 and 1980 are among the finest in outsider folk music. Most of this music was recorded in collaboration with multi-instrumentalist and vocalist Areski Belkacem; she also worked with the folk singer and actor Jacques Higelin and lyricist Olivier Bloch-Lainé during this period. Fontaine’s second record and first for Saravah was Brigitte Fontaine est… Folle, orchestrated by Jean-Claude Vannier and putting forth a singer whose strange rhythms and immediate, aggressive delivery are at odds with twee psych-pop arrangements. Originally released on marbled vinyl in a collagist gatefold sleeve, Fontaine est… was the debut release on actor-composer Pierre Barouh’s Saravah label, which epitomized more than any other imprint the attraction between the new left/May 1968 revolts, the Parisian artistic milieu, and popular youth culture. Along with the work of Fontaine, Belkacem, and Higelin, Saravah issued free jazz from the Cohelmec Ensemble, avant-garde and sound-art work from cellist Jean-Charles Capon and saxophonist Philippe Maté, Gabon folk singer Pierre Akendengue, oddball jazz groups like Trio Camera and the Baroque Jazz Trio, and numerous other outfits.

The first Fontaine LP to feature Belkacem (generally credited only using his first name, Areski) was 1969’s Comme a la Radio, which joined the two singers with expatriate Great Black Music outfit the Art Ensemble of Chicago, trumpeter Leo Smith (who came to Paris from Chicago as part of a 1969 exodus) and French bassist Jean-François Jenny-Clarke. Filling out the ensemble are Higelin, Capon, and Kakino De Paz and Albert Guez on zither and lute, respectively. Comme a la Radio is an album like no other, and probably the high point in the Fontaine-Areski discography, if for no other reason than the eight-minute vamp-and-declamation that comprises the title track. Fontaine’s surreal recitation crests an intricate and slinky groove set by AEC bassist Malachi Favors, accented by the woodwinds of Roscoe Mitchell and Joseph Jarman and the bleak blues of trumpeter Lester Bowie. Held up alongside “Theme de Yoyo” waxed the following year with Fontella Bass as part of their soundtrack for Marcel Camus’ Les Stances a Sophie, it is quite clear that the group cut a strong figure when paired with theatrical vocalists. The rest of Comme a la Radio is full of dusky chants and isolated chamber vignettes, and is sparser than subsequent albums that merge avant-garde orchestration, ethnographically influenced pastiche, and street-busking lyricism. With five more potential reissues in the Fontaine catalog, it is likely and hopeful that Superior Viaduct will find this work a new and interested audience.

• Superior Viaduct: http://www.superiorviaduct.com

Google Glass adds “listen to music” to its list of stuff it can do, so now you don’t have to look like an asshole wearing one of those hideous iPods in public

Here at TMT, we like to keep you, our tech-savvy reader base, so damn abreast of everything that’s happening in the world of Google and its terrifying-because-its-so-friendly world takeover. In fact, we’re so dedicated to that kind of coverage that sometimes we’ll even [make our unpaid college intern Derek] read the New York Times and stuff. Usually that shit is [I’d imagine] boring as hell. But today? Paydirt! Seems that Google is announcing that Glass, its $1,500 pair of sunglasses, is now gonna be able to play music for you! Into your ears!

Here’s the rundown: Glass is now being marketed as a thing that can “search for songs, scan through saved playlists and listen to music in high fidelity.” And yeah, all of this while it sits on your (or, say, Kanye West’s) face as a pair of lens-less frames that respond to voice commands on a little transparent screen projected above your (or again, better yet, Kanye’s) right eye.

When you turn it on (god knows how you do that), it displays “listen to” in a list of possible voice commands, allowing you to simply name a song or artist and start streaming that shit through Google Play (you know, their iTunes app thing that most people don’t really use much right now). So yeah, you can start a play account, link it up with your nerd specks, and get sweet, sweet “access to playlists and song recommendations based on what [you’ve] listened to in the past.” What a time to be astigmatic!

But, yo, I know what you’re gonna ask: “so, the music just streams right into my freakin’ eyeballs then, or what?!?” No! Funnily enough, Google is also rolling out its own set of earbuds, specifically designed for Glass, which will be “available by the end of the month for $85.”

As of now, only Google’s music services are available on Glass, but others are expected to be rolled out as more and more people get with the program and buy into this whole nerdy Star Trek-esque hologram life that’s in store for our pathetic futures. “With these new features, we’re now building a great music experience on Glass, whether you’re a classical music professor, an acclaimed sound engineer and hip-hop producer, or someone who wants to listen to their favorite tunes anytime, anywhere,” says Ed Sanders, the director of marketing for Google Glass. And truly, why the hell shouldn’t he? I mean, he does work there, after all.

• Google: http://www.google.com

Spectrum Spools double your pleasure, fun with dual releases from Max Eilbacher and Steve Moore on December 16

Spectrum Spools is planning two releases on the same day on December 16, which leaves plenty of time for either (or both!) to become confusing Winter Solstice gifts for grandma. The first is Steve Moore’s Pangaea Ultima. Moore’s been all up in the solo synth game for a while, such as on his 2011 Moon Glyph release, but this is his Spectrum Spools debut. Taking its title from a possible future “super-continent” predicted by geologists, the album goes whole hog on the subject of time and space being artificial human constructs, and carries with it a surgeon general’s warning that close listening may result in “transformation into a formless blob that exists outside of the space-time continuum.” With mastering by Rashad Becker and artwork by Robert Beatty, you can be sure that is some serious synth-business. If you’ve got your serious synth-business-suit on, feel free to preorder it here, or listen to “Deep Time” below.

The second release is from Max Eilbacher. And whaddaya know, it’s another debut! Though Eilbacher has played with groups like Matmos and Horse Lords for some time, he’s not yet put out a collection of solo material. This debut, Red Anxiety Tracers, is the product of a year-long effort editing together found and synthesized sounds. It doesn’t carry the surgeon general’s warning like Moore’s record, but your gym teacher wanted me to let you know it’s been described as an “audio obstacle course” so you should probably bring your knee pads. When you’re adequately covered in pads, check out a video preview of the record below (or listen to the “No Room For Breathing” excerpt on the Spectrum Spools SoundCloud) and preorder it here.

Pangaea Ultima tracklisting:

01. Endless Caverns
02. Planetwalk
03. Deep Time
04. Nemesis
05. Pangaea Ultima
06. Logoton
07. Aphelion
08. Endless Mountains
09. Worldbuilding

Red Anxiety Tracers tracklisting:

01. Slowlo / Persistent Scenes / Did the Surfer Survive?
02. (Intro) / Geetar / No Room For Breathing / Rail Trax

• Steve Moore: http://stevemoore2600.tumblr.com
• Max Eilbacher: https://twitter.com/420_horchata
• Spectrum Spools: http://editionsmego.com/releases/spectrum-spools

RIP: John Tavener, British composer

From the BBC:

Sir John Tavener, one of the leading British composers of the past 50 years, has died at the age of 69.

Sir John was known for music that drew on his deep spirituality.

In 1992, The Protecting Veil topped the classical charts for several months and in 1997 his Song For Athene was played at the funeral of Princess Diana.

He had suffered ill health for much of his life, including a major heart attack in 2007. He died at his home in Child Okeford, Dorset, on Tuesday.

• John Tavener: http://www.johntavener.com