Wolfgang Voigt announces book/CD Zukunft Ohne Menschen, hopes that the actual zukunft ohne menschen comes long after its release

Wolfgang Voigt announces book/CD Zukunft Ohne Menschen, hopes that the actual zukunft ohne menschen comes long after its release http://www.tinymixtapes.com/sites/default/files/1307/news-13-07-wolfgang-voigt.jpg

Where would we be without Wolfgang? Well, for one, the need for surprisingly buff animated 5th graders would’ve been left unfulfilled, and we wouldn’t be one step closer to realizing that really really cool wolf/human hybrid only fantasized about in the movies. Names are the precursor to physical transformation, I’ve decided, so just as the name “Wolfgang” will ultimately lead to a new, super-intelligent, albeit vicious and overly hairy, species, the name “Michael” will precede a particular evolution into angels, who aren’t bound by altruism, but by kicking ass and flying and shit. I don’t make the rules. Sorry, Berthas.

Here’s another benefit of Wolfgangs: the founding and continued existence of one of minimal techno’s most influential labels, and a damn near classic collection of 4/4-driven serenity. Wolfgang Voigt is co-founder and co-owner of Kompakt, runs his own label Profan, and has released music under at least a dozen monikers, though his elemental form is his undoubtedly his most well-known. On September 3, Wolfgang Voigt will release (under his own name) Zukunft Ohne Menschen, a deluxe book/CD stemming from a likewise-named sound installation project featured at the entrance to this year’s Art Cologne.

Google Translate-me, please: “Zukunft ohne menschen” means “future without people” in English, and according to Voigt, it’s also a future of arpeggiated minimalism. According to a press release, the 10 compositions sound randomly generated, but were, in fact, manually composed and improvised by Voigt, possibly behind a glowing curtain à la The Wizard of Oz. Accompanying each composition were abstract images of people-removed urban photographs, as an elongated cursor “bored” its way through.

It might be best if you just wait for the 24-page booklet, if you can get your hands on one of the 500 copies.

Zukunft Ohne Menschen tracklisting:

01. Z.O.M. 1.1
02. Z.O.M. 1.2
03. Z.O.M. 1.3
04. Z.O.M. 1.4
05. Z.O.M. 1.5
06. Z.O.M. 1.6
07. Z.O.M. 1.7
08. Z.O.M. 1.8
09. Z.O.M. 1.9
10. Z.O.M. 1.10

• Wolfgang Voigt: http://www.wolfgang-voigt.com
• Kompakt: http://www.kompakt.fm

Wolfgang Voigt announces book/CD Zukunft Ohne Menschen, hopes that the actual zukunft ohne menschen comes long after its release

Where would we be without Wolfgang? Well, for one, the need for surprisingly buff animated 5th graders would’ve been left unfulfilled, and we wouldn’t be one step closer to realizing that really really cool wolf/human hybrid only fantasized about in the movies. Names are the precursor to physical transformation, I’ve decided, so just as the name “Wolfgang” will ultimately lead to a new, super-intelligent, albeit vicious and overly hairy, species, the name “Michael” will precede a particular evolution into angels, who aren’t bound by altruism, but by kicking ass and flying and shit. I don’t make the rules. Sorry, Berthas.

Here’s another benefit of Wolfgangs: the founding and continued existence of one of minimal techno’s most influential labels, and a damn near classic collection of 4/4-driven serenity. Wolfgang Voigt is co-founder and co-owner of Kompakt, runs his own label Profan, and has released music under at least a dozen monikers, though his elemental form is his undoubtedly his most well-known. On September 3, Wolfgang Voigt will release (under his own name) Zukunft Ohne Menschen, a deluxe book/CD stemming from a likewise-named sound installation project featured at the entrance to this year’s Art Cologne.

Google Translate-me, please: “Zukunft ohne menschen” means “future without people” in English, and according to Voigt, it’s also a future of arpeggiated minimalism. According to a press release, the 10 compositions sound randomly generated, but were, in fact, manually composed and improvised by Voigt, possibly behind a glowing curtain à la The Wizard of Oz. Accompanying each composition were abstract images of people-removed urban photographs, as an elongated cursor “bored” its way through.

It might be best if you just wait for the 24-page booklet, if you can get your hands on one of the 500 copies.

Zukunft Ohne Menschen tracklisting:

01. Z.O.M. 1.1
02. Z.O.M. 1.2
03. Z.O.M. 1.3
04. Z.O.M. 1.4
05. Z.O.M. 1.5
06. Z.O.M. 1.6
07. Z.O.M. 1.7
08. Z.O.M. 1.8
09. Z.O.M. 1.9
10. Z.O.M. 1.10

• Wolfgang Voigt: http://www.wolfgang-voigt.com
• Kompakt: http://www.kompakt.fm

Porcelain Raft releases new album, announces fall US tour with one stop in Vancouver to give a shout out to The X-Files

Brooklyn-based, “Italian from Italy” dude Mauro Remiddi’s solo project Porcelain Raft is about to set sail on the stormy waters of the good ol’ fall North American tour. Remiddi’s going to be repping Permanent Signal, his second full-length for Secretly Canadian, which is due August 20. Adrift on the seas of hazy end-of-summer nostalgia pop, anchored by yearning melodies, and blah blah ship metaphor, Porcelain Raft’s fall tour will touch nearly every region of the US and include a one-date Canadian stopover in Vancouver so that everyone in the tour van can reminisce about how awesome The X-Files was.

The album’s first single, “Think of the Ocean” will help you do just that (Think of the ocean, NOT The X-Files, although I mean, you can think of that, too, if you wanna, ya damn NERD), especially if the ocean makes you feel a creeping sense of anxiety and wistfulness. You can check out a trailer for the song right here, and look at a “visual stream” of another track, “The Way Out,” below. Permanent Signal is the follow-up to Remiddi’s critically-acclaimed 2012 release Strange Weekend.

Permanent Signal tracklisting:

01. Think of the Ocean
02. Cluster
03. Minor Pleasure
04. Open Letter
05. Night Birds
06. It Ain’t Over
07. I Lost Connection
08. Warehouse
09. The Way Out
10. Five Minutes from Now
11. Echo

Dates:

09.04.13- Boston, MA - Great Scott
09.05.13 - Brooklyn, NY - Glasslands
09.06.13 - Philadelphia, PA - Johnny Brenda’s
09.07.13 - Washington, DC - Rock and Roll Hotel
09.09.13 - Nashville, TN - The Basement
09.10.13 - St. Louis, MO - Off Broadway
09.12.13 - Chicago, IL - Schubas Tavern
09.13.13 - Madison, WI - The Frequency
09.14.13 - Minneapolis, MN - Triple Rock Social Club
09.16.13 - Denver, CO - Larimer Lounge
09.17.13 - Salt Lake City, UT - Kilby Court
09.19.13 - Seattle, WA - Barboza
09.20.13 - Vancouver, BC - Electric Owl
09.21.13 - Portland, OR - Bunk Bar
09.23.13 - San Francisco, CA - Bottom of the Hill
09.24.13 - Los Angeles, CA - Bootleg Theater
09.28.13 - Dallas, TX - The Prophet Bar
09.30.13 - Birmingham, AL - The Bottle Tree
10.01.13 - Atlanta, GA - The Drunken Unicorn
10.02.13 - Chapel Hill, NC - Local 506
10.04.13 - New York, NY - The Mercury Lounge

• Porcelain Raft: http://porcelainraft.com
• Secretly Canadian: http://www.secretlycanadian.com

RIAA wastes more of its members time and money by increasing the number of takedown requests

While you were out getting drunk and lighting off illegal fireworks this past weekend, the RIAA was hard at work sending Google millions of requests to stop indexing URLs that serve up copyrighted content illegally. Hypebot reports that over the last six weeks alone, the RIAA requested 5 million takedowns, a huge increase over the 20 million takedown requests that were issued in the entire year prior.

So what’s with the uptick in requests? Like any good pirate operation, popular torrent sites now inadvertently spawn tons of similarly offending URLs where people can download the illegal content. No longer can the RIAA just get a place like The Pirate Bay to pull a piece of uploaded content, because as soon as it’s out there, an innumerable number of proxy sites have replicated the original posting. It’s basically the hydra effect, and the RIAA is no doubt wasting a huge amount of money, time, and resources trying to combat something that shows no sign of slowing down.

So why do they continue down this path? Are they trying to singlehandedly employ the glut of recent law school grads? Do they really think that the person who downloaded the new T-Swift album (and never listened to it, btw) was at any point going to be converted into a paying customer? Will there ever not be a shiny new torrent site for people to switch to? If they thought long and hard about it, perhaps they’d realize what a futile effort the take down requests are, and instead encourage the wide proliferation of media that otherwise wouldn’t have nearly the impact on the larger general public. They could then work on converting all those semi-interested downloaders into paying customers through concerts, merch purchases, apps, endorsement deals, etc. Clearly there are an endless number of new revenue streams in the digital age that labels can leverage in the absence of quality music (just ask Jay-Z), so please give the cease and desist a rest.

Death Grips show up fashionably late to 2013, make a few vague excuses and hopefully realistic promises

Death Grips have been fairly quiet this year, and that’s been weird. In 2012 it seemed not even a week could pass without them announcing a tour, dropping a video, announcing an album, canceling a tour, getting dropped from a label, or reannouncing tour dates. That flurry of activity suddenly blew itself out early this year with Death Grips taking a lengthy, if relatively low-profile, tour of Europe. This flying under the radar has left an obvious void and expectations that no band should realistically have to live up to.

Death Grips never stopped plotting though. They have announced a new label called Thirdworlds, in partnership with Harvest/Capitol Records. Fingers crossed this big label entanglement goes better than their last. They have also announced a series of tour dates spanning a few countries. Let us pray to the gods of smashed iMac screens and tinnitus that none of them get canceled. There has been vague talk of a new album, perhaps in early 2014. Now is the time to start a letter-writing campaign for it to be pressed to vinyl. They’ve also posted a video of drummer Zach Hill practicing in handcuffs. Let us hope the key has not been misplaced.

Hello, Death Grips. Even this short interval has seemed too long.

We missed you.

Tour dates:

07.13.13 - Ottawa, ON - Ottawa Blues Fest
07.16.13 - Toronto, ON - Echo Beach at the Molson Amphitheatre
07.26.13 - Niigata, Japan - Fuji Rock Festival
08.02.13 - Chicago, IL - Bottom Lounge
08.03.13 - Chicago, IL - Lollapalooza
08.04.13 - Montreal, QC - Osheaga Fest
08.06.13 - Boston, MA - Royale Boston
08.07.13 - New York, NY - Webster Hall
08.09.13 - Baltimore, MD - Ottobar
08.24.13 - Los Angeles, CA - FYF Fest
10.12.13 - Mexico City, Mexico - Corona Capital Fest

• Death Grips: http://thirdworlds.net

Sweden and Finland continue good relations with collaborative album by Mika Vainio & Joachim Nordwall

The relations of Finland and Sweden have a long history.

The area that later became Finland was annexed by Sweden during the 13th century and was ruled by Swedish monarchs up until 1809. Finland was a fully integrated part of the Swedish realm, and, legally, the Finns had the same rights and duties as all citizens. But the language used in administration and education was Swedish. During the 20th century, after Finland’s 1917 freedom from Russian rule, much of the governmental administration and higher education was conducted according to old tradition with disproportionate amounts in Swedish.

During World War II, Sweden declared its neutrality, but in the Winter War it declared itself Non-belligerent and supported Finland’s cause to a certain, but limited, extent. This included over 8,000 Swedish military & airforce volunteers. Sweden also accepted and cared for a host of Finnish “war”-children during World War II. After the war, Sweden had a clear head-start in the post-war economic development, much due to its neutrality in the war, making the Finnish-Swedish relationship similar to that of Finland and Estonia of today since the 1990s. Since the mid-1990s, the inequalities between Finland and Sweden can be seen as balanced, and the relations between the two countries can be seen as equal and good.

Now in September of 2013, both Finland and Sweden will offer to one another their finest purveyors of noise in an historic collaboration between Sweden’s Joachim Nordwall and Finland’s Mika Vainio. The collaborative record, titled Monstrance, will represent the continuing bond between these two nations and will be released on Touch on September 2, 2013. And just as Sweden brings the best out of Finland, so does Nordwall bring the best out of Vainio, as according to Boomkat, Nordwall “encourages him to drop the Pan Sonic percussion tics and strike a little further out into the unknown.” Hear the track “Irkutsk” below:

Monstrance tracklist:

01. Alloy Ceremony
02. Live at the Chrome Cathedral
03. Midas in Reverse
04. Irkutsk
05. Praseodymium

• Mika Vainio: http://www.media-loca.com/mikavainio
• Joachim Nordwall: https://soundcloud.com/joachim-nordwall
• Touch: http://www.touchmusic.org.uk