Atlas Sound
“Terra Incognita”

I’ve always liked Atlas Sound better than Deerhunter, so it’s pretty COOL that the next chapter in the Bradford Cox saga involves a new Atlas Sound album. It shall be titled Parallax and will be out on November 7 and will be released through 4AD and will hopefully be prettyyy, prettyyy, prettyyyy, pretty good. Stream above or download here.

• Atlas Sound: http://deerhuntertheband.blogspot.com
• 4AD: http://www.4ad.com

Atlas Sound

“Terra Incognita”

I’ve always liked Atlas Sound better than Deerhunter, so it’s pretty COOL that the next chapter in the Bradford Cox saga involves a new Atlas Sound album. It shall be titled Parallax and will be out on November 7 and will be released through 4AD and will hopefully be prettyyy, prettyyy, prettyyyy, pretty good. Stream above or download here.

• Atlas Sound: http://deerhuntertheband.blogspot.com
• 4AD: http://www.4ad.com

Lawrence English

“The Roar Ceasing”

In my previous post on Lawrence English, I noted how his music feels like a slice of the micro world slowed down and forced into a huge macro space. I keep coming back to the word “lumbering” because the sounds seem to have a physical mass, which makes sense – according to English, The Peregrine is largely about nature, about landscape and minute details juxtaposed against their overwhelming surroundings. More specifically, the album is a homage to a book by J.A. Baker, also titled The Peregrine, which chronicles a year of the author’s obsessive observations of two peregrine falcons in the wild. Such focus on birds performing instinctively in their natural habitat inevitably contrasts our own identities against the indifferent functionality of nature, until the viewer or author begins to disappear. The same concealing of authorship and ego can also be seen in this ‘ambient’ or drone music, which often focuses on minute details – as distinguishing factors – set against a larger shared landscape. English has this to say about the loss of ‘humanness’ in J.A. Baker’s text, which I think is offered as a parallel to the Peregrine’s music as well:

At no point does the idea of humanness come to dominate – in fact human kind merely appears as haunting images that, as Baker summarizes, ‘stink of death’. Elegantly misanthropic. Even the author remains oddly mute – we never discover anything about him, not what he does, how he lives or even where he sleep or eats. He is merely a conduit through which land is rendered.

• Lawrence English: http://lawrenceenglish.com/
• Experimedia: http://label.experimedia.net/

Richard Youngs

“Furrows Again”

Richard Youngs, who’s so prolific that not even he owns everything he’s recorded, added to his vast catalog last month with Amplifying Host, an incredibly beautiful yet peculiar album that got us so excited we had to scream EUREKA. In our review, TMTer Ian Latta wrote how the album sounds “broken” (sounds, not is), a particularly interesting descriptor, given how fluidly and seamlessly the music flows. But Latta’s completely right. In an interview with The Quietus, Youngs explains how both the album’s chord progressions and tempos were randomly determined to “bypass any decision-making.” Indeed, there is nothing fixed about this album; it’s all ellipses, movement, instability.

This is all visually reflected in the video for “Furrows Again,” the first track off Amplifying Host. Directed by Naomi Yang (of Damon & Naomi), the video’s momentum is derived from a sense of aimlessness and transition, an unsettling feeling for listeners who expect their caterpillars to turn into butterflies. But those who are willing to submerge themselves in less predictable experiences from a musician whose compositional practices are anything but routine will find much to enjoy here.

• Richard Youngs: http://myspace.com/richardyoungsmusic
• Jagjaguwar: http://www.jagjaguwar.com

Stare Case (John Olson and Nate Young)

“Days like Faces”

On September 13, Stare Case will release Lose Today, a new full-length on the venerable De Stijl label. The album features two boys you probably hold close to your heart: Wolf Eyes members John Olson and Nate Young. Listen to Young’s thumping bass as Olson works the woodwinds on “Days Like Faces.” It sounds like a mutated rendition of Throbbing Gristle’s “Persuasion.”

[Photo: Experimental Club]

• De Stijl: http://destijlrecs.com

Bon Iver and James Blake

“Fall Creek Boys Choir”

Once upon a time, two white dudes named James Blake (TMT Review) and Bon Iver (TMT Review) wrote some tunes that set the world on fire. We don’t know if it was fate or what, but James Blake and Bon Iver became buds at SXSW and have since leveraged their power as people with white skin to create a new track, “Fall Creek Boys Choir” — via email no less! I don’t know about you guys, but I’m really digging this video’s minimalism:

• James Blake: http://jamesblakemusic.com
• Bon Iver: http://boniver.org

  

CHOCOLATE GRINDER is our audio/visual section, with an emphasis on the lesser heard and lesser known. We aim to dig deep, but we'll post any song or video we find interesting, big or small.