Graham Lambkin
“Abersayne”

Man, our boy Graham Lambkin has been on a roll this year, you guys. First, he continued to challenge our perspectives on the role of space in improvised music with the unnervingly static Making A with Keith Rowe, then he unleashed this searing Shadow Ring set on the world, and now he’s currently breaking our hearts with the striking Photographs with Jason Lescalleet (review forthcoming), while simultaneously dropping the unreal song-oriented “Abersayne/Attersaye” 7-inch.

Lambkin is no stranger to pop music, given his brilliant deconstructions of song craft with the Shadow Ring and his issuing of a Dan Melchior record on his own Kye label. However, “Abersayne” is by far the most traditionally “song”-oriented work that Lambkin’s produced. Over a beautiful guitar loop and hissing tape noise, Lambkin wails and croons in a manner that’s less like his spoken word vocals on The Shadow Ring’s work and more like a combination of the wordless cooing on Neu’s “Lieber Honig,” mixed with a deep appreciation for old-school blues phrasing. It’s a really lovely work, but like all of Lambkin’s fixings, there’s much more going on than just the surface level loveliness of the song.

I have a belief that much of Lambkin’s work is concerned with capturing the artist’s both physical and mental space in a very Bachelard-ian sense. Mr P and others have touched upon this in their reviews of Lambkin’s work, and even though “Abersayne” may initially appear as a simple pop exploration, close listening suggests that Lambkin’s singular view of space is still at play here. The whooshing background noise on the track almost suggests that it could’ve been a continuation of Lambkin’s car recordings. Knowing Lambkin’s affinity for appropriating and obscuring samples/sound sources, the guitar that carries this track could easily be from some unknown source. Perhaps, like Lambkin’s work on Amateur Doubles, “Abersayne” is the composer’s attempt to recreate a particular moment in an undefined space when a fragment of music emerged as a joyously song-like soundtrack to him. Or maybe, “Abersayne’s” song-like qualities function as the choral samples do on Salmon Run, forcing the listener to register the physical space in which he or she is listening to this musical excerpt, in the way that Lambkin does in his usual mental space. One thing is for sure, though: the lo-fi spatial ambiguities of Lambkin’s work coupled with their sheer beauty make for works that never fully lose their mystery and warrant repeat listens. “Abersayne’s” warped pop makes for one of the most mysterious and lovely spaces that Lambkin’s created yet.

“Abersayne’/’Attersaye” is out now via Kye Records. Check out “Abersayne” here:

• Kye: http://www.kyerecords.blogspot.com

Graham Lambkin

“Abersayne”

Man, our boy Graham Lambkin has been on a roll this year, you guys. First, he continued to challenge our perspectives on the role of space in improvised music with the unnervingly static Making A with Keith Rowe, then he unleashed this searing Shadow Ring set on the world, and now he’s currently breaking our hearts with the striking Photographs with Jason Lescalleet (review forthcoming), while simultaneously dropping the unreal song-oriented “Abersayne/Attersaye” 7-inch.

Lambkin is no stranger to pop music, given his brilliant deconstructions of song craft with the Shadow Ring and his issuing of a Dan Melchior record on his own Kye label. However, “Abersayne” is by far the most traditionally “song”-oriented work that Lambkin’s produced. Over a beautiful guitar loop and hissing tape noise, Lambkin wails and croons in a manner that’s less like his spoken word vocals on The Shadow Ring’s work and more like a combination of the wordless cooing on Neu’s “Lieber Honig,” mixed with a deep appreciation for old-school blues phrasing. It’s a really lovely work, but like all of Lambkin’s fixings, there’s much more going on than just the surface level loveliness of the song.

I have a belief that much of Lambkin’s work is concerned with capturing the artist’s both physical and mental space in a very Bachelard-ian sense. Mr P and others have touched upon this in their reviews of Lambkin’s work, and even though “Abersayne” may initially appear as a simple pop exploration, close listening suggests that Lambkin’s singular view of space is still at play here. The whooshing background noise on the track almost suggests that it could’ve been a continuation of Lambkin’s car recordings. Knowing Lambkin’s affinity for appropriating and obscuring samples/sound sources, the guitar that carries this track could easily be from some unknown source. Perhaps, like Lambkin’s work on Amateur Doubles, “Abersayne” is the composer’s attempt to recreate a particular moment in an undefined space when a fragment of music emerged as a joyously song-like soundtrack to him. Or maybe, “Abersayne’s” song-like qualities function as the choral samples do on Salmon Run, forcing the listener to register the physical space in which he or she is listening to this musical excerpt, in the way that Lambkin does in his usual mental space. One thing is for sure, though: the lo-fi spatial ambiguities of Lambkin’s work coupled with their sheer beauty make for works that never fully lose their mystery and warrant repeat listens. “Abersayne’s” warped pop makes for one of the most mysterious and lovely spaces that Lambkin’s created yet.

“Abersayne’/’Attersaye” is out now via Kye Records. Check out “Abersayne” here:

• Kye: http://www.kyerecords.blogspot.com

3:33 & Cannibal Ox

The Bicameral Vein

One of only four hip-hop albums to crack the top 20 of TMT’s Favorite 100 Albums of 2000-2009, Cannibal Ox’s The Cold Vein stands today as one of the most groundbreaking and divisive albums in hip-hop history. A generation-defining masterwork, it can be viewed as a major step in the genre’s evolution, a biomech bull charge from past to future. Like an event horizon, it obscures for the observer the space between then and now. Cue strange, dark connotations.

Enter via orchestra pit 3:33, whose 7 Sets of 7 tape, released about one year ago, made ritual sacrifices of several modern-day classics in order to put their sickly reanimated forms on display like The Night Gallery. I say renanimated rather than remixed because (it sounds cooler and) when it comes to a song like Can Ox’s “Stress Rap,” there isn’t really much to mix in traditional rap terms. Unless you’ve direct access to the Definitve Jux recording archives, there’s no way to come across an official a cappella. The best one can hope to do is artificially isolate the vocal tracks, and even then, remnants of the original instrumentals will inevitably hang about like poltergeists in white noise.

So instead of trying to “remix” The Cold Vein, 3:33 have decided to pay homage the only way they know how: by blasting it with breaks and tones strategically culled from the abyss, that eerie aforementioned between-space. Stream/download The Bicameral Vein below and be wary of 3:33’s new double album The Bicameral Brain dropping October 29.

• Parallel Thought: http://pthought.com
• Cannibal Ox: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cannibal_Ox

dil.withers + bessedof

NEWSUN(S) [preview]

Totally in a personal way, I see jazz and most improv as something based on body movement. Mainly, I find it involves how the music is “moving” the composer of sounds, and how the audience “feels” that movement. So, here it is: the super-moving second collaborative installment by dil.withers and bessedof. New tape is called NEWSUN(S), and this here [preview] video was made by another TMT big-deal musician, LAMPGOD.

Now, in relation to this new mix by dil.withers and bessedof, the movement of genres and mingling of beats and melodies clash the same way no shoes on a city dance floor clashes. It’s perfect in moment. Fleeting with intention. And definitely something these feet will repeat on down the road, but somewhere else. In some other way of life. As for the video by LAMPGOD, it presents NEWSUN(S) in the same speed it’s given sonically: something always in motion, but in tight snippets of this, that, and the skating on by.

NEWSUN(S) by dil.withers and bessedof will be for sale tonight (around 9 PM) on Bootleg Tapes, limited to 50 tapes, so prepare to move each moment as various as you can.

• dil.withers: https://soundcloud.com/dilsound
• bessedof: http://bessedof.bandcamp.com
• Bootleg Tapes: http://bootlegtapes.bandcamp.com

James Ferraro

“QR JR.”

James Ferraro’s new album, NYC, HELL 3:00 AM, is a terrifying exploration into American decay, nihilism, and alienation. While Far Side Virtual’s themes were similarly bleak — its artificial ringtone jingles and boardroom music heightening the grotesquery of our simulated consumer society — it had an aesthetic approach that, at least on the most superficial of levels, felt comfortable and safe, sounds already so internalized that it barely registered as critique. NYC, HELL 3:00 AM, however, actually sounds like decay, nihilism, and alienation. It’s overwhelmingly dark, but incredibly emotional stuff.

Ferraro’s latest video is for “QR JR.,” and it appears to be a somewhat 11th-hour addition to the new album, the themes of which are laid out pretty clearly here. Check it out above (courtesy of V Magazine), look for NYC, HELL 3:00 AM this week on Hippos in Tanks, and catch him on tour if you can, too.

• James Ferraro: http://twitter.com/LIL_ICEBUNNY
• Hippos in Tanks: http://hipposintanks.net

Gobby

Mixtape from the Du Pt.1

Mr P: dang, gobby just dropped a mixtape
C Monster: that’s ALL you, P
C Monster: do it
C Monster: hurry
Mr P: haha
C Monster: get on it
C Monster: i’ll get on it
C Monster: NO
C Monster: YOU GET ON IT
C Monster: do it
C Monster: spank dat
C Monster: talk about your dreams last night in relation to it
C Monster: maybe you manifested it to happen?
Mr P: what else should i talk about?
C Monster: LOL
Mr P: seriously haha
C Monster: perpetuate a lie
C Monster: talk about how you THINK he did some other stuff before hand
C Monster: or MAY actually be Arca in disguise
C Monster: or he has an unseen/hidden third arm
C Monster: i.e., he’s a mutant
C Monster: that’s why nobody has seen’t him
C Monster: that technically calling Gobby him or her is incorrect?
Mr P: should i mention his Fashion Lady LP and Lantern EP?
C Monster: i dunno
C Monster: unless it’s only in light of linking our writing
Mr P: he also had that collabo with James K as SETH
C Monster: Gobby owns a mango salsa booth at the Brooklyn flea market, but only charges $4 a bottle
C Monster: i like that SETH bit a lot too
C Monster: yeah, link that
Mr P: deforrest’s review is going up soon. it’s good
Mr P: this new Gobby mix is called Mixtape from the Du Pt. 1. bet a lot more is coming soon. he’s so prolific
C Monster: i was NOT into Fashion Lady
C Monster: but Lantern will make my top 50
C Monster: ima do 50 this year
Mr P: lantern is in my top 50 too
Mr P: would you be mad if i made this conversation the choco post?
C Monster: no, it’ll work
Mr P: serious? like, literally, i’d paste this conversation
C Monster: do it HAHAHa
Mr P: hahah ok, i better post the download link and embed in here too then

• Gobby: http://www.gobbygobby.com
• UNO NYC: http://www.unonyc.com

CHOCOLATE GRINDER is our audio/visual section, with an emphasis on the lesser heard and lesser known. We aim to dig deep, but we'll post any song or video we find interesting, big or small.