1982: The Del Byzanteens - Lies to Live By

Short-lived projects like the Del Byzanteens are often great ways of entering the archives of discarded culture. When Deleuze and Guattari first inflicted Jung’s concept of the rhizomatic nature of history on generations of college students, they were trying to suggest that you could get into history through the side door; that if you used the less stately entrance you might be exposed to a more complex, indeed more ‘Byzantine’ world of connections. The main point of entry for music scene historians into world of the Del Byzanteens is the internet factoid that their keyboard player and vocalist was film-maker Jim Jarmusch.

If you only listened to the labyrinthine garage of “Girl’s Imagination” for its ‘byzantine charms’ it might be enough; the track hits you with the feeling you get when you know you’ve found yourself some genuine old and dirty underground hit – a tune that actually got played at parties. But if you limited yourself this way, you’d miss out on other highlights of a great one time album; for example Supreme’s cover “My World is Empty Without You” or the keyboard experimentalism on “Apartment,” not to mention the 60s garage hustle of “Welcome.” Likewise if you assumed that Jarmusch is the mad genius behind all of this, just because he’s the only recognizable name, you’d be missing the eclectic influences that fed the Del Byzanteens.

As a band that only had one LP, their history was typically rhizomatic – lateral rather than deep. And as a New York band, with many connections in a tightly squeezed city of millions, we can assume this may have been more true for them than for most. Guitarist Dan Braun played with Glenn Branca and Michael Gira; the brothers Brown became film producers and horror comic archivists in later life (already in the 80s the Del Byzanteens were cultivating a horror B-Movie garage sound similar to The Cramps, also New York based). Phil Kline was to become a maverick experimental composer. The band’s sound itself was not correspondingly eclectic. Most tracks were characterized by an active pogo-ing baseline and tight straightforward drumming, with deranged honky tonk belly dancer keyboards and other curious flourishes thrown in to keep it interesting.

But it also happens for our generalizing purposes that Dan Braun’s high school band was called Spinal Root Gang, featuring none other than the protean Madonna Ciccone. In an interview with The Washington Post in the 1980s Jarmusch claimed that his free film-making was influenced by the spirit of a music scene that was DIY rather than professional. Sometimes when you turn over a stone, a scene is crawling with connections that seem to have had a lifelong influence on careers that at first seemed unique and entirely self-created.

1968-78: V/A - Bosporus Bridges: A Wide Selection of Turkish Jazz and Funk

I don’t know all that much about Turkish jazz-funk music, but the good thing about an album like this is that you don’t really need to know the stories behind the (in this case proggy-soul) bands before they went a whole different direction, broke up, or descended into relative obscurity. The songs stand on their own without context. Or maybe the lack of context just makes the whole listening experience better, by casting that sense of mystery and myth that eludes some bands you already “know.”

What I can tell you about this compilation is that it was curated by Roskow Gretschman, a German hip-hop/club music DJ associated with the Jazzanova project. It’s fitting that the songs stray toward jazz throughout the album much more than they approach full-fledged funk. Needless to say, the choices are diverse and flat-out fun.

Ferdi Özbeğen’s “Köprüden Geçti Gelin” has been the track I’ve returned to most often just because it was sampled for an Action Bronson song and I have a friend who’s obsessed with the food-obsessed rapper. The song contains a wonderful hi-hat riding drum arrangement, and it’s easy to understand why a rap producer would want to chop it up. Erkin Koray is the name on here you may actually have heard of. His album Elektronik Türküler came to my attention years ago, because it is a masterpiece of Turkish-folk-infused psychedelic prog music. I’m pretty sure his is the only song on the compilation to use a Bağlama.

Besides that, I had to dig for information about each band. Most of them are fronted by percussionists it seems. Aksu Orkestrasi reach toward Sun Ra’s “Space Is The Splace” with “Bermuda Seytan Üçgeni” — opening the song with sounds of the seashore and closing it with crescendoing spacy keyboard jabs. Drummer Erol Pekcan contributes two excellent tracks. The first is a sprawling modal piano-centric jazz number (“Şenlik”) while the second (“Gel Sevgilim”) is more of a traditional call-and-response soul song equipped with a killer horn section. Drummer Okay Temiz probably contributes the most well-blended fusion of Western soul-jazz and Turkish folk for his track, while another drummer, Durul Gence, leads his group through “Hilal,” which is apparently a famous Ottoman military march jazzed up, disassembled, and put back together again. Gence, having worked with experimental-leaning artist Sonny Sharrock, frames the album’s context for those who need that kind of thing. This isn’t traditional jazz or traditional funk music. It’s just a pretty damn great collection. Check out Volume 2 here.

1999: Kazumoto Endo - While You Were Out

Who says noise can’t be fun? Because “fun” perfectly describes the sound of Kazumoto Endo’s While You Were Out, a record that feels like a great realization of the first two decades of Japanoise as it had been growing into a large music scene. Endo’s level of creativity and enthusiasm, frankly, make a lot of similar artists sound boring in comparison. It’s no surprise that when C. Spencer Yeh released his primer of Japanoise last week he chose to end his mix with Endo’s “Itabashi Girl.” His music acts like a swan song for a very niche group of music that expanded into a far wider audience once the new millennium started.

The great example to start with is “Shinjuku Kahki Pants” which (like many of the best parts on While You Were Out) warps sampled pop music into a mountain of noise, while retaining the form of the original sources. Distorted loops will constantly change up and reveal themselves as a disco groove, or a drum fill from a rock song will dart and disappear before you know it. The most thrilling and funny (Endo’s wonderful sense of humor pops up all over this record) moment comes when all of the cacophony disappears and from the silence a little harpsichord melody dances into your ear. A smooth bass line comes with it, followed by a Japanese girl delicately laughing, and right as your thought process manages to form “what the fu…” − BAM we’re pulled back into another blast of pulsing distortion. The first time I heard it I couldn’t help but laugh and find it weirdly charming.

“Itabashi Girl” remains Endo’s most memorable and loved song, by taking that same bait and switch to a gleeful extreme with his expert sampling. Endo cuts up an obnoxious disco loop endlessly, constantly interrupting it with his dense waves of distortion, but always returning back to that same repetitive loop. The call and response grows more frantic, and as the sample keeps returning you begin to question what has more value. Endo’s sections are certainly atonal, but there’s variety, incredibly original timbres, complex rhythms, and a liberating sense of musical freedom against the same glitzy hook repeated ad nauseam. It’s a cool idea, sort of, but the conclusion of the song reveals Endo not just as another great noise artist, but a true innovator and genius of the genre. The two sections which were separated begin to overlap, and melt into each other. Eventually the disco and the noise are all the same, all equal, and as the song grows louder and denser and builds and samples of shouting girls grow in speed and volume… everything cuts out and we hear an orgasmic declaration to “MOVE YOUR BODY!” And it clicks that that’s exactly what this song, this “harsh noise,” has been making you want to do the whole time. It’s becomes not about what type of music has more value but that all music, sound really, can be ugly, stupid, beautiful, clever, funny, and touching often all at once.

It apparently took Endo some time to actually get into the noise scene. According to one bio written about him, he enjoyed it but found the recorded albums boring. Though his opinion did change eventually after hearing certain albums (thanks Merzbow!) that belief comes across when listening to While You Were Out. This record sounds like somebody who is restless, the same way artists from Charlie Parker to DJ Sprinkles’ on The Midtown 120 Blues were restless, and knew the music around them was so much more. Endo’s record, in his incredibly tiny discography (this is arguably his only studio album), shows an artist working without any boundaries and having a really fun time doing it. It remains an absolute peak for Japanese Noise.

1981: New Order - “Dreams Never End”

The first and the last LPs in New Order’s 80s catalog are funny things. They represent two very different extremes from the band that crawled out of the mopey ashes of Joy Division to become acid-house indie-dance gods. While 1989’s Technique hardly has any trace of the dark post-punk origins of the band in its sunny dance-floor vibes, their 1981 debut Movement is the sound of three already gloomy musicians coping withe the suicide of their best friend. The result is understandably bleak.

Surprisingly, though, the first track “Dreams Never End” eschew much of the plodding moroseness that dominates the album in favor of a sound much closer to the dance music the band would make in years to come. Like one other song on the album, “Doubts Even Here,” bassist Peter Hook is on vocal duty instead of the group’s usual frontman Bernard Sumner. Though “Hooky” is known for melodic basslines rather than vocal chops his delivery is still solid, if a bit detached, and the song is an interesting snapshot of what could have been. But fret not, because what Hook lacks in vocal range he more than makes up for with the most expressive bass playing of any post-punk outfit. His riffs from Joy Division songs like “Digital” and “Love Will Tear Us Apart” are legendary and he delivers a similarly memorable and catchy performance here. Bouncing between only two or three notes, Hook’s bass adds a strong sense of motion and movement to the track and largely invents what would become New Order’s impossible-to-stand-still-to sound. The other trademark ingredients like Stephen Morris’ machine-like drumming and Sumner’s razor guitar lines are there too, but from beginning to end this is Hook’s show and holy hell does he deliver.

Movement is a good album, don’t get me wrong, but “Dreams Never Die” outpaces the rest of the record by a mile, showing much more than any other song the band’s deep desire to evolve and the sound of what New Order would become rather than what they had already been.

2001: Zen Guerrilla - Shadows On the Sun

In the early 00’s several bands wanted to take back rock n’ roll from fusions and modern studio technology. It became a simple throwback instead of a renaissance, recreating the old looks and sounds, all done professionally. It was nice, melodic and well done but, to me, lacked the uniqueness and vividness that the original stuff had. It lacked what made it stand out in the 60s – what made people want to start the revolution in the first place.

Then again, if you turned off the radio around that time, looking for “real” rock n’ roll in terms of heat and excitement, you might have stumbled upon Zen Guerrilla’s masterful album Shadows On the Sun. This record not only brought back garage and R&B from the 60s but did so with such swagger, spark, and circumstance that you couldn’t help but getting up, shouting and dancing and popping someone in the eye. It’s the spirit of music repossessed by young musicians sounding like the pioneers did in between fistfights and sneaking a toke at the sock hop. Zen Guerrilla were not newcomers, they were on their fifth album and second for Sub Pop. They also shared their sense of desperation and fire with New Bomb Turks, but the way they played the notes and violently let their spirit loose is what gave bands like Zen their place. This makes them more than just music or – worse – product, they become a sense, a drug, an emotional state.

There’s nothing overtly original about their songs, except they are well executed, well written, and played like meteors that are falling from the sky – it seems that not only will there be no tomorrow, but we might not even see the end of today either. Others might have the radio hits and critical approval; Zen Guerrilla have the spirit of getting it on.

2011: Iceage - New Brigade

Somehow TMT managed to turn a blind eye last year on one of the most exciting/ass-kicking punk bands of 2011. Without a review or a spot on our year end list (a travesty, I know), Iceage has been painfully absent from our site and now it’s time to remedy that. Hailing from Copenhagen, Denmark, Iceage is composed of four angry dudes that are hardly out of their teens but already know their way around a mean hook and a fuzz petal or two or three. Inheriting quite a bit from the godfathers of furious sub-two-minute post-punk, Wire, their debut album New Brigade packs as much anger and ruptured eardrums into 25 minutes as any piece of music I’ve ever heard.

Most of their tunes are merely short bursts, maybe one or two riffs repeated a couple times, but a mix of scathingly raw production and an embrace of some gnarly guitar noise adds layers to otherwise stark songs. The Steve Albini-ish production leaves almost all the bands energy intact, and whatever loss of fidelity is suffered is more than made up for by how immediate and large all the instruments sound – especially the guitar and drums. “Broken Bone” opens with a guitar that is hammered out until the strings sound like they’re about to break, a typical moment of highly wound tension where the band thrives somewhere between a new level of intensity and falling apart completely.

But sheer noise wouldn’t mean shit (or a spot as my favorite of the year) without something more to grasp onto – something that worms its way into your head. Surprisingly, many of New Brigade’s memorable hooks are found in the vocals and Iceage’s choruses can be downright anthemic. “You’re Blessed,” “White Rune,” and more or less all their songs forgo screams for whats best described as a deep below, carrying as much anger as pure shouts would but with loads more expression and melody. With these guys and Lower releasing debuts from Denmark in the past year, the post-punk scene has gotten a bit angrier and much much more exciting.

There's a lot of good music out there, and it's not all being released this year. With DeLorean, we aim to rediscover overlooked artists and genres, to listen to music historically and contextually, to underscore the fluidity of music. While we will cover reissues here, our focus will be on music that's not being pushed by a PR firm.