DJ Nigga Fox Noite E Dia

[Príncipe; 2015]

Styles: Afro-Portuguese, techno, house, afro-house, tarraxinha, batida, kuduro
Others: DJ Marfox, DJ Nedwyt Fox, Blacksea Não Maya, DJ Lycox, Nidia Minaj, CDM, Tia Maria Produções

Indicative of the frame of reference, Noite E Dia declares itself as a meaningful occasion from the outset. With the amount of forceful music coming out of Lisbon’s Príncipe stable lately, it is difficult for any one release to stand apart from the rest. Indeed, the collective noise of Lisbon has been largely felt as a whole, quite reasonably given the music has been racking up over substantial time while its relatively sudden, sweeping discharge has taken unsuspecting ears and torsos by surprise. What’s more, the nest on which DJ Nigga Fox — a.k.a. Rogerio Brandao — is roosted is compelling enough that individual endeavors may be easily overlooked.

Sonically, the way that opening track “Um Ano” sets up is symbolic of the occasion: a sustained amassing of noise ultimately yielding to the throbbing, exuberant percussion that is the lifeblood of Noite E Dia. For one, the production value is notably distinguished; there is a clarity that differentiates it from, for example, Nidia Minaj’s Danger, the preceding release on Príncipe alongside CDM’s Malucos De Raiz. It is evidently the product of a DJ coming to terms with their craft — less an experimentation than a refined brand — and there is conviction in its makeup. It is is also a marked development from Nigga Fox’s debut EP, 2013’s O Meu Estilo. While the former undoubtedly left a strong impression, Noite E Dia is more conscientious in composition and universally more mature.

Each track is highly involved with myriad textures, generally consisting of variable honking synths that yoyo around metallic beats and sliced vocal stabs. The title of the EP — Portuguese for “night and day” — is an accurate metaphor for the abundant juxtaposition of styles, be they European tech or Afro-Portuguese. “Tio Kiala” arguably hits hardest, with confrontational shouts and a filtered, acidic bass line that somehow stays intact despite perpetually caving in. Closing track “De Leve” is a further highlight and the most elemental track, with a sluggish, plodding rhythm trailed by a simple, undulating lead synth.

Favorably, the convoluted nature of the EP gives the impression of something much longer, as opposed to the four tracks that it is, evading any possibility of discontent. Aside from the arrangements, the use of effects and manner of sonic processing is complex and sophisticated, and the leverage of computer technology is clearly discernible. To that end, it is easy to see how Nigga Fox fits alongside an array of electronic music artisans on a wider scale, such as T C F, DJ Richard, or Karen Gwyer, and why Warp Records is set to release an EP of tracks by Lisbon DJs that includes Nigga Fox. Fundamentally, with every Príncipe release inflating the cacophony, Noite E Dia is individually and undeniably assured.

Links: DJ Nigga Fox - Príncipe

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