Without the invigorating threat of a miserly major record label breathing down their necks, Radiohead have apparently found themselves lonely for the good ol' days of being behind the 8 ball. But since they're like the biggest non-U2 band on the whole damn planet and have, well, pretty much fired everyone who might have been inclined to give them shit about their careers, Thom Yorke and the boys have turned to the only logical remaining option: they've decided to let their fans hassle them instead.

According to a recent post on their website, the environmentally mental Radiohead have developed "a new section of the site that gig-goers can visit" from which we, the lowly fans, can "try out [their] carbon calculator and compare different methods for getting to and from the venue." The list of tourdates will also arm environmentally conscious fans with public transportation information relating to each venue as well as "incentives for car sharing." Incentives? What, like free internet downloads or something??

But the good, clean fun doesn't stop there! Each week, Radiohead's production team will deliver a new progress report on how the band has or hasn't been addressing their own touring carbon footprint, as well as whether or not they've been making it easier for the "gig goers" to reduce theirs. Fans can log on and gloat about the band's successes and, even better, climb atop the virtual soapbox about their failings at w.a.s.t.e.-central. From there, eager environmentalists can also post their own local travel information for cities where the band is touring, hook up with potential car-poolers, and, you know, shake their mother earth-loving finger at Thom Yorke. Sounds pretty good, huh?

Anyway, this new, green web page is called "the most gigantic flying mouth for some time" (a much cooler title than In Rainbows if you ask me) and comes on the heels of their post from December last year assessing their carbon footprint for an average overseas tour and the commissioned report on touring and CO2 generation. So what are you waiting for?? Get on there and scrutinize Radiohead! God knows you don't get the chance to do that very often.

Uh, oh yeah, and in case you forgot or have been living under a rock or something, Radiohead's huge fucking WORLD TOUR is currently in full-swing:
05.06.08 - Tampa, FL - Ford Amphitheatre *
05.08.08 - Atlanta, GA - Lakewood Amphitheatre *
05.09.08 - Charlotte, NC - Verizon Wireless Amphitheatre *
05.11.08 - Bristow, VA - Nissan Pavilion at Stone Ridge *
05.14.08 - St. Louis, MO - Verizon Wireless Amphitheatre *
05.17.08 - Houston, TX - Cynthia Woods Mitchell Pavilion *
05.18.08 - Dallas, TX - Superpages.com Center *
06.06.08 - Dublin, Ireland - Malahide #
06.07.08 - Dublin, Ireland - Malahide #
06.09.08 - Paris, France - Bercy #
06.10.08 - Paris, France - Bercy #
06.12.08 - Barcelona, Spain - Parc del Fòrum (Daydream Festival) *#$
06.14.08 - Nimes, France - Arenes #
06.15.08 - Nimes, France - Arenes #
06.17.08 - Milan, Italy - Civica Arena #
06.18.08 - Milan, Italy - Civica Arena #
06.20.08 - Neuhausen ob Eck, Germany - Southside Festival
06.22.08 - Scheeßel, Germany - Hurricane Festival
06.24.08 - London, England - Victoria Park #
06.25.08 - London, England - Victoria Park #
06.27.08 - Glasgow, Scotland - Glasgow Green #
06.29.08 - Manchester, England - Lancashire County Cricket Club #
07.01.08 - Amsterdam, Netherlands - Westerpark #
07.03.08 - Roskilde, Denmark - Roskilde Festival
07.05.08 - Werchter, Belgium - Rock Werchter Festival
07.06.08 - Arras, France - Main Square Festival
07.08.08 - Berlin, Germany - Wuhlheide
08.01.08 - Chicago, IL - Grant Park (Lollapalooza)
08.03.08 - Indianapolis, IN - Verizon Wireless Music Center %
08.04.08 - Cleveland, OH - Blossom Music Center %
08.06.08 - Montreal, Quebec - Parc Jean-Drapeau %
08.08.08 - Jersey City, NJ - Liberty State Park (All Points West Festival)
08.09.08 - Jersey City, NJ - Liberty State Park (All Points West Festival)
08.12.08 - Camden, NJ - Susquehanna Bank Center %
08.13.08 - Mansfield, MA - Tweeter Center %
08.15.08 - Toronto, Ontario - Molson Amphitheatre %
08.19.08 - Vancouver, British Columbia - Thunderbird Stadium *
08.20.08 - Auburn, WA - White River Amphitheatre *
08.22.08 - San Francisco, CA - Golden Gate Park (Outside Lands Festival)
08.24.08 - Los Angeles, CA - Hollywood Bowl *
08.25.08 - Los Angeles, CA - Hollywood Bowl *
08.27.08 - Chula Vista, CA - Cricket Wireless Amphitheatre *
08.28.08 - Santa Barbara, CA - Santa Barbara Bowl *
10.01.08 - Osaka, Japan - Municipal Central Gymnasium
10.02.08 - Osaka, Japan - Municipal Central Gymnasium
10.04.08 - Tokyo, Japan - Saitama Super Arena
10.05.08 - Tokyo, Japan - Saitama Super Arena

* Liars

% Grizzly Bear
# Bat for Lashes

$ Ensemble Nacional de España de Müsica Contemporánea (Jonny Greenwood compositions)

Bon Iver Touring! If You’re Into That…

So, Bon Iver, I saw your postcard flier thing in the record store a few weeks ago. It was on the counter by the register, placed their nonchalantly, advertising your little April stint around the Midwest like I was supposed to know about it all along, like some marketing ploy to guys like me who aren't in-the-know but want to be. "Hey, there's a show at the Lakeshore Theater. Oh, but wait, it's tonight." I couldn't help but imagine (as you probably intended) a snooty voice saying "sorry" with a disinterested laugh for the full effect. I was glad I didn't imagine a "sucks to be me," as often happens with you. In hindsight, I'm glad it was the snooty voice; I didn't want to go anyway.

But whatever, I didn't buy your album. Oh I saw it there; it was right in front. Kind of pricey though, someone thinks pretty highly of themselves... It looked nice, presentable at least. I suppose you have to attract someone. Personally, I don't go for that look anymore. Dolled up in flashy black, and that cursive writing... a little too desperate if you ask me. I saw it at some other stores, too -- boy, you get around. But I hear the record is doing well. That's wonderful, really. I mean, I have heard it, wasn't impressed though. Not my thing, you know? It isn't bad, if you like that sort of thing. No, I need something a little more, a little less about them, someone who calls when they're in town.

Don't take it personally, though. I didn't when I saw those postcard ads. There were a bunch; guess a lot of people didn't want to go to your show. April 10, hmm... where was I? Oh that's right, I was super totally busy probably. I was at a bar with some people from work, and no, they aren't work friends -- they're just friends I happen to work with. Mark did that thing with his elbows and... you had to be there. I would've taken them to your show, had I known about it, but we all had better things to do that night anyway.

A band played at the bar, too. That's right, and they were just as good, maybe even way good. They were pretty solid, a little blues/jam/bar rock. You wouldn't be into that though; you're sensitive. Jealous? Don't act like it doesn't bother you, I've heard your songs. Ev-uh-ree thing bothers you. Why don't you go bother up a tree? And who's Emma, anyway?

Come to Chicago, see if I care:

*with Iron & Wine

Dan Deacon Slated to Release New LP in the Fall, Summer Tour

Dan Deacon is nearly finished recording Bromst, the follow-up to last year's spastic Spiderman of the Rings. He's currently in the studio with his buds, putting the finishing touches on the album, which has actually been in the works for quite some time now. In fact, Deacon began work on the album before Spiderman was even released! Fucked up, I know! I could hardly believe it either when I first heard the news, but I sure believe it now. Sometimes, you just have to have faith, you know? I actually feel kind of bad that I was a non-believer at first, but better late than never. I'll definitely be more receptive next time. That I promise.

Carpark is tentatively planning to release Bromst either late September or some time in October. (BUT WHAT ABOUT THE TRACKLISTING.) In the meantime, check out Deacon's video for "Okie Dokie," and good luck finding a copy of Wham City Box #1 (TMT News). At least you have a chance to check out his summer tour.

Photo: [Frank Hamilton]

It’s Not Fair! Eggheads Breakdown Music Geometrically, But Clueless Musicians Still Get All the Groupies

“Music of the Spheres,” ratio-driven explanations, 12-note scales, circle of fifths, meantone tuning, the Greek genera... music and math have been close acquaintances for centuries, but perhaps never has music been analyzed in such a displayable fashion. Three professors -- Clifton Callender of Florida State University and Ian Quinn and Dmitri Tymoczko of Princeton University -- have devised a method that places musical language into contemporary geometry. Expanding on earlier work by Tymoczko (which is dealt with nicely by Julie Rehmeyer on Mathtrek here), the three profs published “Generalized Voice-Leading Spaces” in the April 18 issue of Science, and the work has been widely praised. As Rachel Wells Hall of St Joseph's University claims, it “stands out both for the breadth of its musical implications and the depth of its mathematical content.” Assigning mathematical structure to families of chords, notes, scales, and using levels of abstraction, the "geometrical music theory" places music into "quotient spaces," ultimately generating geometrical figures.

Callendar, quoted on EurekAlert, tries to layperson the theory:

Imagine being near the peak of a mountain and needing to get to the immediately opposite location. You could proceed clockwise around the peak, counter-clockwise, or directly over the peak. These same three paths represent unique types of motions between major and minor triads in the space of three-note chord types, which is a cone. In fact, these motions and chords have been ubiquitous in Western music since medieval times to the present day.

Callender, you had me at “Imagine...”

Speaking in “future of music” terms, a few interesting questions arise:

- Are there chords and scales floating in geometric space that are rarely used or have yet to be discovered?
- What applications can the theory have in differentiating the superiority of certain musical styles (perfect for jazz snobs who can now mathematically prove their preferred racket is structurally more complex than the preferred rackets of rock, reggae, blues, techno, etc.)?
- Can the theory be applied to Eastern music, or is it just amenable to Western music?
- Can it translate Japanese noise legend Merzbow?
- What good is a geometry-based theory when everyone knows all songs employ the same three chords?

As far as practical applications are concerned, Tymoczko, courtesy of Scientific Blogging, says, “You could create new kinds of musical instruments or new kinds of toys. You could create new kinds of visualization tools -- imagine going to a classical music concert where the music was being translated visually. We could change the way we educate musicians.” Um, I guess he’s never played anything on Windows Media Player?

Tymoczko adds, “The most satisfying aspect of this research is that we can now see that there is a logical structure linking many, many different musical concepts. To some extent, we can represent the history of music as a long process of exploring different symmetries and different geometries.”

Although some will argue that such a deep understanding renders art emotionless or unlovable, that line of reasoning couldn't be further from the truth. Theory lovers know that base understanding only makes something cold if you are cold. Delving and appreciating underlying foundations and multiple levels of anything can lead one to beauty unimagined by shallow surface-dwellers. Imagine the satisfaction you will get when your “Man, this part of Rush's ‘Spirit of the Radio’ kicks ten kinds of ass!” is coupled with an appreciation of its categorization of “OPTIC symmetries?” Forget math rock; mathletes are your new gods!

It’s Not Fair! Eggheads Breakdown Music Geometrically, But Clueless Musicians Still Get All the Groupies

“Music of the Spheres,” ratio-driven explanations, 12-note scales, circle of fifths, meantone tuning, the Greek genera... music and math have been close acquaintances for centuries, but perhaps never has music been analyzed in such a displayable fashion. Three professors -- Clifton Callender of Florida State University and Ian Quinn and Dmitri Tymoczko of Princeton University -- have devised a method that places musical language into contemporary geometry. Expanding on earlier work by Tymoczko (which is dealt with nicely by Julie Rehmeyer on Mathtrek here), the three profs published “Generalized Voice-Leading Spaces” in the April 18 issue of Science, and the work has been widely praised. As Rachel Wells Hall of St Joseph's University claims, it “stands out both for the breadth of its musical implications and the depth of its mathematical content.” Assigning mathematical structure to families of chords, notes, scales, and using levels of abstraction, the "geometrical music theory" places music into "quotient spaces," ultimately generating geometrical figures.

Callendar, quoted on EurekAlert, tries to layperson the theory:

Imagine being near the peak of a mountain and needing to get to the immediately opposite location. You could proceed clockwise around the peak, counter-clockwise, or directly over the peak. These same three paths represent unique types of motions between major and minor triads in the space of three-note chord types, which is a cone. In fact, these motions and chords have been ubiquitous in Western music since medieval times to the present day.

Callender, you had me at “Imagine...”

Speaking in “future of music” terms, a few interesting questions arise:

- Are there chords and scales floating in geometric space that are rarely used or have yet to be discovered?
- What applications can the theory have in differentiating the superiority of certain musical styles (perfect for jazz snobs who can now mathematically prove their preferred racket is structurally more complex than the preferred rackets of rock, reggae, blues, techno, etc.)?
- Can the theory be applied to Eastern music, or is it just amenable to Western music?
- Can it translate Japanese noise legend Merzbow?
- What good is a geometry-based theory when everyone knows all songs employ the same three chords?

As far as practical applications are concerned, Tymoczko, courtesy of Scientific Blogging, says, “You could create new kinds of musical instruments or new kinds of toys. You could create new kinds of visualization tools -- imagine going to a classical music concert where the music was being translated visually. We could change the way we educate musicians.” Um, I guess he’s never played anything on Windows Media Player?

Tymoczko adds, “The most satisfying aspect of this research is that we can now see that there is a logical structure linking many, many different musical concepts. To some extent, we can represent the history of music as a long process of exploring different symmetries and different geometries.”

Although some will argue that such a deep understanding renders art emotionless or unlovable, that line of reasoning couldn't be further from the truth. Theory lovers know that base understanding only makes something cold if you are cold. Delving and appreciating underlying foundations and multiple levels of anything can lead one to beauty unimagined by shallow surface-dwellers. Imagine the satisfaction you will get when your “Man, this part of Rush's ‘Spirit of the Radio’ kicks ten kinds of ass!” is coupled with an appreciation of its categorization of “OPTIC symmetries?” Forget math rock; mathletes are your new gods!

Nickelback’s Chad Kroeger, The Folk Hero, Gets Served

Justice has finally been served. Not in the sense that justice has been delivered, but in the way Stan and his friends got served by a neighboring dance crew. Let's tip the scales, shall we?

Chad Kroeger, the banal growling frontman of Nickelback, was pulled over by the Canadian authorities at the typically suitable time of 2 AM on June 22, 2006. He was driving his $175,000 Lamborghini at estimated speeds of over 160 km/h (or 100 mp/h). Naturally, given the hour of the incident, he stank of booze and prompted a breathalyser test. His blood alcohol level was twice the legal limit. Chad pled not guilty anyway.

By some small miracle of faith, the court didn't go for the innocence plea and sentenced Kroeger with the harshest of penalties. On May 2, He received a $600 fine and a suspended license for a whole year. $600 wouldn't even buy a floor mat from the car he was driving, yet he still plans on appealing the ruling.

I mean, how could he ever afford a chauffeur? It's not like his band hasn't sold some 30 million albums or anything. I would hope if this happened in the U.S., the police would at least have the decency to drag him out the car by his curly mullet and curb stomp him against his diamond encrusted hubcaps untill he sobered up enough to be thrown in jail. He deserves nothing less than the star treatment, after all.

Starbucks Diverts Attention Away From Its Music Label And Back to Its Non-Free Trade Beans

Don't want to toot my own horn, but I saw this coming. Last week, Starbucks reported that it will be shifting attention away from its joint venture label, Hear Music, and back to its bread ‘n’ butter... uh, coffee beans. The decision was made due to minuscule gains in the music industry last year coupled with an overall company drop of 21%, from $150.8 million to $108.7 million.

Starbucks says the nosedive is due to decreased customer traffic. Not that Starbucks ever had a well-defined customer base, but its decision to stock Paul McCartney and Hilary McRae probably didn't do much to attract the younger demographic. Who wants their "Starbucks experience" to signify midlife crisis?

According to Howard Schultz, some Starbucks dude:

"Fiscal 2008 is a transitional year for Starbucks and, while our financial results are clearly being impacted by reduced frequency to our U.S. stores, we believe that as we continue to execute on the initiatives generated by our transformation agenda, we will reinvigorate the Starbucks experience for our customers."

Nine Inch Nails Release Free Album Again, Kinda Pull A Second “Radiohead”

I know a band with a lot of leisure time, and it ain't Lightning Bolt! (Because they're recording a new album in the studio right now.) It's Nine Inch Nails, and I know this because, well, they released yet another album online via their website, a quick "follow-up" to Ghosts I-IV (TMT Review). Titled The Slip, the 10-song release contains "The Discipline," a single that also garnered headlines like "Nine Inch Nails release free single!" when the band posted it on its website a couple weeks back (as if no band had ever done that before).

Take it, Trent:

as a thank you to our fans for your continued support, we are giving away the new nine inch nails album one hundred percent free, exclusively via nin.com.

the music is available in a variety of formats including high-quality MP3, FLAC or M4A lossless at CD quality and even higher-than-CD quality 24/96 WAVE. your link will include all options - all free. all downloads include a PDF with artwork and credits.

for those of you interested in physical products, fear not. we plan to make a version of this release available on CD and vinyl in july. details coming soon.

And, similar to Ghosts, The Slip, has been released under the awesome Creative Commons license.

The Slip tracklisting:

1. 999,999
2. 1,000,000
3. Letting You
4. Discipline
5. Echoplex
6. Head Down
7. Lights in the Sky
8. Corona Radiata
9. The Four of Us Are Dying
10. Demon Seed

Length: 43:45. Check the tourdates here.

Joe Lally Embarks On Solo Tour, Fugazi Continues On With Frustrating Hiatus

Since 2002, my favorite band in the entire world, Fugazi, has been on indefinite hiatus. Do you know how difficult it is to call a band your favorite when you can’t even see them live or anticipate them releasing new music? I’ll tell you, it’s pretty difficult.

Thankfully, the members of Fugazi don’t completely hate their fans, as they’ve been respectively working on solo projects and producing other bands, keeping themselves just slightly in the public eye. Case in point: bassist Joe Lally, who is embarking on a solo tour this month in support of his newest album, Nothing Is Underrated. Whatever you do, don’t be that asshole in the crowd who yells out for him to play “Waiting Room”; that shit’s not cool.

Joe Lally Is Underrated:

INTRODUCING… TMT FILM!

Surprise! While you were smoking pot and passing out on your couch for the 17th night in a row, we gnomes were working overtime at TMT headquarters, running dangerous experiments, and offering human sacrifices to the media gods. Well, our work has finally paid off. Allow us to introduce to you the one, the only, the first, the last, the ultimate... TMT FILM!

That’s right, kids, your favorite music site is venturing into the world of moving pictures. We’ll be bringing you new content every week, including reviews, features, and coverage of film festivals around the country. Because TMT Film emerged organically from the interests of the TMT staff, we’ll be covering the kinds of movies that are most exciting to us and, we hope, to all of you. Our focus will be on independent and underground movies, foreign films, revivals, and cult stuff. That isn’t to say that we won’t offer a unique take on more mainstream fare from time to time, but, as with our music content, we want to spread the word about great work that is flying under the radar rather than add to the overexposure of blockbusters.

We know that change can be frightening at first, so we want to make sure everyone understands that the old TMT that we all love isn’t going anywhere. Music is still the center of our universe, but, as Woody Allen feared in Annie Hall, the universe is expanding. We’re not going for world domination, brand expansion, or any of that other bullshit. And we wouldn’t dream of reducing our music coverage by even a little bit.

So, click here for TMT Film. We hope you love it and can’t wait to hear what you think.